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Harvard University professor Charles Lieber is surrounded by reporters as he leaves the Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Dan Ariely has found that "what separates honest people from not-honest people is not necessarily character, it's opportunity." Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images

An artist's rendering of DNA. Scientists have found traces of DNA that they say is evidence that prehistoric humans procreated with an unknown hominin group in West Africa. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

'Ghost' DNA In West Africans Complicates Story Of Human Origins

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Paul McKay, a molecular immunologist at the Imperial College School of Medicine in London, checks a dish of bacteria containing genetic material from the new coronavirus. He and his team are testing a candidate vaccine. Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images
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Will That Antidepressant Work For You? The Answer May Lie In Your Brain Waves

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Your body needs trace amounts of zinc for cell division and other basic biology. Nobody's sure how it works to shorten colds. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

A spoonful of honey makes the medicine...irrelevant. That's because honey works better than cough syrups to help with kids' coughs. But don't give honey to infants under one years old. Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm

For Kid's Coughs, Swap The Over-The-Counter Syrups For Honey

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Solar Orbiter, seen in this artistic rendering, is a collaboration between the European Space Agency and NASA to study the sun and what drives the solar wind that creates space weather that affects Earth. ESA/ATG medialab hide caption

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ESA/ATG medialab

Methuselah, the first date palm tree grown from ancient seeds, in a photo taken in 2008. Guy Eisner hide caption

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Guy Eisner

Dates Like Jesus Ate? Scientists Revive Ancient Trees From 2,000-Year-Old Seeds

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In this satellite image handout from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Hurricane Bill is seen August 19, 2009 in the Atlantic Ocean. Scientists say it generated hundreds of stormquakes along the eastern coast of the United States. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Discovering 'Stormquakes'

Seismologist Wenyuan Fan explains the accidental discovery — buried deep in seismic and meteorological data — that certain storms over ocean water can cause measurable seismic activity, or 'stormquakes.' He says this phenomenon could help scientists better understand the earth below the sea.

Discovering 'Stormquakes'

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This image from an electron microscope shows a cross-sectional view of an oligodendrocyte (blue) among nerve fibers coated with myelin (dark red). In models of autism spectrum disorder, oligodendrocytes appear to create too much or too little myelin. Jose Luis Calvo/Science Source hide caption

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Jose Luis Calvo/Science Source

Researchers Link Autism To A System That Insulates Brain Wiring

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"It's not going to be transported on a box," Dr. Michael Ison, an infectious disease specialist at Northwestern University, says of your chances of contracting the novel coronavirus from packages shipped from China. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

No, You Won't Catch The New Coronavirus Via Packages Or Mail From China

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Making sure to frequently give your hands a thorough scrub — with soap and for about as long as it takes to sing the "Happy Birthday" song a couple of times — can significantly cut your chances of catching the flu or other respiratory virus. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Worried About Catching The New Coronavirus? In The U.S., Flu Is A Bigger Threat

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Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Muotri Lab/UCSD hide caption

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Muotri Lab/UCSD

Scientists Find Imperfections In 'Minibrains' That Raise Questions For Research

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Roughly 1 in 10 infants were born prematurely in the U.S. in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drug Makena is widely prescribed to women at high risk of going into labor early, though the latest research suggests the medicine doesn't work. Luis Davilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Davilla/Getty Images

H5N1 bird flu virus is the sort of virus under discussion this week in Bethesda, Md. How animal viruses can acquire the ability to jump into humans and quickly move from person to person is exactly the question that some researchers are trying to answer by manipulating pathogens in the lab. SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh