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Scientist He Jiankui was criticized by colleagues after his claim to have created gene-edited babies became public. Three leading scientific organizations are calling for more controls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

A highly potent synthetic opioid, fentanyl is often mixed into other drugs sold on the street, including pills, heroin and even cocaine. Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Sea ice is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the northwest coast of Greenland in March 2017. A new report says rapid warming over the past three decades has led to a 95 percent decline of the Arctic's oldest and thickest ice. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Arctic Report Card Documents 'Cascading Effects' Of Warming Ocean Temperatures

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A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Starving The Watchdog: Who Foots The Bill When Newspapers Disappear?

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Research Gaps Leave Doctors Guessing About Treatments For Pregnant Women

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Researchers say they've found a way to let queen bees pass on immunity to a devastating disease called American foulbrood. The infectious disease is so deadly, many states and beekeeping groups recommend burning any hive that's been infected. Here, a frame from a normal hive is seen in a photo from 2017. Bernadett Szabo/Reuters hide caption

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Bernadett Szabo/Reuters

There has been a backlash since Chinese scientist He Jiankui's claim that he edited genes in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies

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Thick clouds emanate from a coal-burning power plant in Baishan, in the Jilin province of China. In an effort to boost its economy, China has recently started greenlighting coal projects that had been on hold. Christian Petersen-Clausen/Getty Images hide caption

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Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

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Childhood infections may increase the risk of developing certain mental illnesses in childhood and adolescence. Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source

The reasons for why Americans and Canadians choose to tweet differently is difficult to determine. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

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Study Shows Americans Are Meaner On Twitter Than Canadians

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Unless you're an extreme athlete, recovering from an injury, or over 60, you probably need only 50 to 60 grams of protein a day. And you probably already get that in your food without adding pills, bars or powders. Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR hide caption

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Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?

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While a day or two of complete rest may be necessary for kids after a concussion, any more could leave them feeling isolated and anxious, says Angela Lumba-Brown, a pediatric emergency medicine physician who helped shape new guidelines. Gregoire Sitter/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Kids With Concussions Can Phase In Exercise, Screen Time Sooner Than Before

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American biologist David Baltimore criticized a fellow scientist who claims he has edited the genes human embryos during the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong. China News Service/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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China News Service/VCG via Getty Images

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

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Researcher He Jiankui spoke Wednesday during the 2nd International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies

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Tianjin, in northern China, is home to Tianjin University, an international research center that recently hired an American to lead its school of pharmaceutical science and technology. He recruits students from all over the world, he says, and the program's classes are taught in English. Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students

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Genetics researcher He Jiankui said his lab considered ethical issues before deciding to proceed with DNA editing of human embryos to create twin girls with a modification to reduce their risk of HIV infection. Critics say the experiment was premature. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR

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NASA engineers on the flight team celebrate the InSight spacecraft's successful landing on Mars at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., on Monday. Al Seib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA Probe Lands Safely On Martian Surface

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Fabio Consoli for NPR

Bringing Up Baby

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People who are sensitive to the bitterness of caffeine tend to drink more coffee than others, while people sensitive to bitter flavors like quinine drink less coffee, according to a new study. Dimitri Otis/Getty Images hide caption

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