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Researchers have observed that the friendliest male bonobos, like this male resident of Lola Ya Bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, tend to be the most successful. Early humans may have had the same experience with their peers. Ley Uwera for NPR hide caption

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Ley Uwera for NPR

Tony Potts, a 69-year-old retiree living in Ormond Beach, Fla., receives his first injection earlier this year as a participant in a Phase 3 clinical trial of Moderna's COVID-19 candidate vaccine. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

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Learning to ride a bike can lead to memorable tumbles. It's the brain's "time cells," scientists now say, that help organize and seal those experiences in our minds. Peter Cade/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Cade/Getty Images

Why Some Memories Seem Like Movies: 'Time Cells' Discovered In Human Brains

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A harvester works through a field of corn near Santa Rosa, Calif. This corn has been genetically modified, and contains bacterial genes that kill certain insects, but the genes have become less effective. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

During deep sleep, waves of cerebrospinal fluid (blue) coincide with temporary decreases in blood flow (red). Less blood in the brain means more room for the fluid to carry away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. Fultz et al. 2019 hide caption

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Fultz et al. 2019

One More Step Toward Solving The Sleep & Alzheimer's Puzzle

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Increasingly, many people in the U.S., like these teens in a Miami grocery story in August, now routinely wear face masks in public to help stop COVID-19's spread. But social distancing and other public health measures have been slower to catch on, especially among young adults, a national survey finds. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A box of Twinkies sat in Colin Purrington's basement for eight years, until just a few weeks ago. Two West Virginia University scientists are studying the fungi growing on them. Matt Kasson hide caption

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Matt Kasson

On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb the spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don't have sufficient masks and other personal protective equipment. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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SDI Productions/Getty Images

They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That May Spread The Virus

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Researchers have detected water molecules in Clavius crater, in the moon's southern hemisphere. The large crater is visible from Earth. NASA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NASA/Screenshot by NPR

Recruiting patients for medical studies has been challenging during the pandemic, especially older people who are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously Despite The Pandemic

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This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 images collected on Dec. 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

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jimhudspeth_2019s-embed Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED

Jim Hudspeth: How Do We Hear — And How Do We Lose Our Ability To Hear?

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A new study has found that home sale prices and volume appear to be declining in Florida coastal areas at vulnerable-to-rising sea levels compared to coastal areas with less risk. Here, the balcony view from a luxury condo in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla., in 2017. Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images

Tobacco plants are being used in the development of COVID-19 vaccines. One is already being tested in humans. Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Tobacco Plants Contribute Key Ingredient For COVID-19 Vaccine

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Matt Kasson

A Disturbing Twinkie That Has, So Far, Defied Science

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Brain cells that monitor liquid, mineral and salt levels in the body influence what types of drinks we crave when thirsty. Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images hide caption

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Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images

Water Or A Sports Drink? These Brain Cells May Decide Which One We Crave

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Pluto on July 14, 2015. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

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American adults over 30 say they're drinking 14% more often during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a report in the journal JAMA Network Open. Luca Bruno/AP hide caption

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Luca Bruno/AP

The winners of the Nobel Prizes in science have been overwhelmingly white and male, raising questions about whether the prizes can change with the times. Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

The Nobels Overwhelmingly Go to Men — This Year's Prize For Medicine Was No Exception

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A Nobel Prize gold medal seen during the manufacturing process in the Swedish Mint. The medals, presented to each laureate, are made of 18 karat recycled gold and weigh 175 grams (6.13 ounces). The economics medal weighs 185 grams (6.48 ounces). Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint) hide caption

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Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint)