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Potential COVID-19 vaccines are kept in a tray at Novavax labs in Maryland on March 20. The Novavax vaccine requires an immune-boosting ingredient called an adjuvant to be effective. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Researchers uncover why shaving can cause sharp blades to dull quickly. Gustavo Rezende Dos Santos/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Gustavo Rezende Dos Santos/EyeEm/Getty Images

Cutting-Edge Research Shows How Hair Dulls Razor Blades

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Conner Curran, 9, (right) and his brother Will, 7, at their home in Ridgefield, Conn. The gene therapy treatment that stopped the muscle wasting of Conner's muscular dystrophy two years ago took more than 30 years of research to develop. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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Kholood Eid for NPR

Scientists in Canada have diagnosed malignant cancer for the first time in a dinosaur, a Centrosaurus apertus from 76 to 77 million years ago. Sergey Krasovskiy/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergey Krasovskiy/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

New Research Shows Dinosaurs Suffered From Malignant Cancer, Too

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Vaccine-makers are readying 190 million doses of the flu vaccine for deployment across the U.S. this fall — 20 million more doses than in a typical year. A nasal spray version will be available, as well as shots. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The SpaceX capsule sits aboard a recovery ship in the Gulf of Mexico. NASA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NASA/Screenshot by NPR

Splashdown! SpaceX And NASA Astronauts Make History

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A scientist is pictured working during a visit by Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (unseen), to Oxford Vaccine Group's laboratory facility at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford, west of London on June 24, 2020, on his visit to learn more about the group's work to establish a viable vaccine against coronavirus COVID-19. STEVE PARSONS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEVE PARSONS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

On the left is an unmodified hatchling of a longfin inshore squid (Doryteuthis pealeii). The one on the right was injected with CRISPR-Cas9 targeting a pigmentation gene before the first cell division. It has very few pigmented cells and lighter eyes. Karen Crawford hide caption

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Karen Crawford

The First Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists

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Blood plasma — the yellowish, cell-free portion that remains after red and white blood cells have been filtered out by a machine and returned to the plasma donor — is rich with antibodies. Plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients might prove useful in preventing infection as well as in treatment, scientists say. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19

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People wait in line outside a testing site in Florida. The state has seen unprecedented surges in coronavirus cases in recent weeks. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Pandemic Is Overwhelming U.S. Public Health Capacity In Many States. What Now?

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Michael Conley, who is deaf, models a mask that has a transparent panel in San Diego on June 3. Face coverings can make communication harder for people who rely on reading lips, and that has spurred a slew of startups and volunteers to make masks with plastic windows. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Demand Surges For See-Through Face Masks As Pandemic Swells

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Australian fingerlimes, related to citrus are gaining popularity as an exotic fruit. Miguel Canahuati. /Miguel Canahuati. hide caption

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Miguel Canahuati. /Miguel Canahuati.

Exotic Australian Fruit May Help Save Florida's Citrus Industry

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Conner Curran, 9, (right) and his brother Will, 7, at their home in Ridgefield, Conn., this week. The gene therapy treatment that stopped the muscle wasting of Conner's muscular dystrophy two years ago took more than 30 years of research to develop. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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Kholood Eid for NPR

Several lines of evidence now suggest that two common vaccines against respiratory illnesses can help protect against Alzheimer's, too. How much brain protection they offer will require more intensive study to quantify, scientists say. Themba Hadebe/AP hide caption

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Themba Hadebe/AP

Flu Shot And Pneumonia Vaccine Might Reduce Alzheimer's Risk, Research Shows

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Public health officials advise social distancing strategies and masks, in part because the latest evidence suggests that catching the coronavirus, even if you're young, is risky business. A significant portion of COVID-19 survivors suffer fatigue, blood clots, fevers and other symptoms for weeks and months after clearing the infection. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Without A Vaccine, Researchers Say, Herd Immunity May Never Be Achieved

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Researchers have been investigating how long antibodies to the coronavirus last in people who have recovered from infections. Simon Dawson/Pool via AP hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Pool via AP

How Long Will Immunity To The Coronavirus Last?

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Dr. Glenn Lopez administered a standard test for the coronavirus to Daniel Contreras at a mobile clinic in South Los Angeles last week. Though highly accurate, such tests can take days or more to process. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Rapid, Cheap, Less Accurate Coronavirus Testing Has A Place, Scientists Say

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An experimental vaccine candidate being developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University to protect against COVID-19 triggered an immune response against the coronavirus and appeared to be safe. Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images

Biomarin Pharmaceutical, a California company that makes what could become the first gene therapy for hemophilia, says its drug's price tag might be $3 million per patient. Maciej Frolow/Getty Images hide caption

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Maciej Frolow/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For Hemophilia, But Could Be Most Expensive U.S. Drug Ever

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Pregnancy is a time of hope and dreams for most women and their families — even during a pandemic. Still, their extra need to avoid catching the coronavirus has meant more isolation and sacrifices, too. Leo Patrizi/Getty Images hide caption

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Leo Patrizi/Getty Images

Safe Pregnancy As COVID-19 Surges: What's Best For Mom And Baby?

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