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A late Triassic-era rausuchian, one of the rival reptile lineages who lost out to the dinosaurs. Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons

Charles F. "Chuck" Sams III is the first Native American director of the National Park Service. He's working to facilitate US government collaboration with tribes on managing public lands. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Working With Tribes To Co-Steward National Parks

In the final episode of Short Wave's Summer Road Trip series exploring the science happening in national parks and public lands, Aaron talks to National Park Service Director Charles Sams, who recently issued new policy guidance to strengthen the ways the park service collaborates with American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes, the Native Hawaiian Community, and other indigenous peoples. It's part of a push across the federal government to increase the level of tribal co-stewardship over public lands. Aaron talks with Sams, the first Tribal citizen to head the agency, about how he hopes this will change the way parks are managed, how the parks are already incorporating Traditional Ecological Knowledge, and what national parkland meant to him growing up as a member of the Cayuse and Walla Walla tribes on the Umatilla Indian Reservation in eastern Oregon.

Working With Tribes To Co-Steward National Parks

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Simply improving our breathing can significantly lower high blood pressure at any age. Recent research finds that just five to 10 minutes daily of exercises that strengthen the diaphragm and certain other muscles does the trick. SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR

Daily 'breath training' can work as well as medicine to reduce high blood pressure

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Karen Douthitt (left) found she does not carry the rare genetic mutation for early-onset Alzheimer's dementia, but her older sister June Ward (right) does carry it. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR

Three Sisters And The Fight Against Alzheimer's Disease

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Morning dew hangs on blades of grass on April 18, 2018 in Pulheim, Germany. FEDERICO GAMBARINI/DPA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FEDERICO GAMBARINI/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

A pharmacy in New York City offers vaccines for COVID-19 and flu. Some researchers argue that the two diseases may pose similar risks of dying for those infected. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Scientists debate how lethal COVID is. Some say it's now less risky than flu

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Heat wave chuchart duangdaw/Getty Images hide caption

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chuchart duangdaw/Getty Images

Heat Can Take A Deadly Toll On Humans

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Illustration of the expansion of the Universe. The Cosmos began 13.7 billion years ago (left). Immediately it began expanding and cooling (stage 1). Its expansion slowed about 10 billion years ago (stage 2). We are now at stage 4. The expansion shows no signs of stopping and is in fact accelerating. The orange arrows indicate the force of gravity, which slows but does not stop the expansion. MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

What The Universe Is Doing RIGHT NOW

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Even though the sisters hope a successful drug treatment for their family's form of dementia will emerge, they're now planning for a future without one. "There's a kind of sorrow about Alzheimer's disease that, as strange as it seems, there's a comfort in being in the presence of people who understand it," Ward says. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR

With early Alzheimer's in the family, these sisters decided to test for the gene

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Big Bend National Park is home to a range of habitats: desert, mountains and river. The Chisos Mountains are at the heart of the park. At their heights, cooler forest ecosystems with pinyon pines, junipers and the endangered Guadalupe fescue emerge. Carolyn Whiting hide caption

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Carolyn Whiting

Dr. Tim Maloney and Andika Priyatno work at the site in a cave in East Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia, on March 2, 2020. The remains, which have been dated to 31,000 years old, mark the oldest evidence for amputation yet discovered. Tim Maloney/Griffith University via AP hide caption

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Tim Maloney/Griffith University via AP

The telescopes of the SPECULOOS Southern Observatory in the Atacama Desert, Chile. The telescopes were used to confirm and characterize a new planet discovered by NASA, which led to the discovery of another nearby planet. ESO/P.Holárek hide caption

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ESO/P.Holárek

Ben Elliott gets barreled at the BSR Surf Resort, where artificial waves are attracting world-class talent. Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort hide caption

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Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort

Surf's Always Up — In Waco, Texas

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NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft, standing atop the mobile launcher at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system prior to crewed flights to the Moon. NASA/Kim Shiflett hide caption

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NASA/Kim Shiflett

Artemis: NASA's New Chapter In Space

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A recent study found jumping spiders exhibit REM sleep-like activity while resting. Daniela Roessler hide caption

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Daniela Roessler

Spiders show signs of REM-like activity, raising the question: Do they dream?

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There are five active volcanoes in Washington State. Of the five, Glacier Peak is the most remote. U.S. Geological Survey hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey

The federal government wants to roll out another round of COVID-19 boosters this fall but drugmakers are still testing the new boosters. The Food and Drug Administration has said it will base its evaluation of the boosters on data from mouse studies, in a controversial move. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

What's behind the FDA's controversial strategy for evaluating new COVID boosters

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There are two known species of manta ray, the giant manta ray and the reef manta ray. Both populations are at-risk due to threats like fisheries and pollution. The IUCN lists the giant manta ray as endangered and the reef manta ray as vulnerable. Rachel T Graham/MarAlliance hide caption

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Rachel T Graham/MarAlliance

Ode To The Manta Ray

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Miss Jocelyn Bell, 1968. A photograph of Jocelyn Bell Burnell (born 1943) at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory at Cambridge University, taken for the Daily Herald newspaper in 1968. Daily Herald Archive/National Science & Media Museum/SSPL via Getty Images hide caption

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Daily Herald Archive/National Science & Media Museum/SSPL via Getty Images

The Radio Wave Mystery That Changed Astronomy

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