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Recruiting patients for medical studies has been challenging during the pandemic, especially older people who are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Getty Images hide caption

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A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously Despite The Pandemic

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This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 images collected on Dec. 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

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jimhudspeth_2019s-embed Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED

Jim Hudspeth: How Do We Hear — And How Do We Lose Our Ability To Hear?

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A new study has found that home sale prices and volume appear to be declining in Florida coastal areas at vulnerable-to-rising sea levels compared to coastal areas with less risk. Here, the balcony view from a luxury condo in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla., in 2017. Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images

Tobacco plants are being used in the development of COVID-19 vaccines. One is already being tested in humans. Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Tobacco Plants Contribute Key Ingredient For COVID-19 Vaccine

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Matt Kasson

A Disturbing Twinkie That Has, So Far, Defied Science

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Brain cells that monitor liquid, mineral and salt levels in the body influence what types of drinks we crave when thirsty. Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images hide caption

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Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images

Water Or A Sports Drink? These Brain Cells May Decide Which One We Crave

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Pluto on July 14, 2015. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

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American adults over 30 say they're drinking 14% more often during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a report in the journal JAMA Network Open. Luca Bruno/AP hide caption

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Luca Bruno/AP

The winners of the Nobel Prizes in science have been overwhelmingly white and male, raising questions about whether the prizes can change with the times. Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

The Nobels Overwhelmingly Go to Men — This Year's Prize For Medicine Was No Exception

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A Nobel Prize gold medal seen during the manufacturing process in the Swedish Mint. The medals, presented to each laureate, are made of 18 karat recycled gold and weigh 175 grams (6.13 ounces). The economics medal weighs 185 grams (6.48 ounces). Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint) hide caption

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Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint)

Heavenly Pettigrew, left, and her parents Stephanie and Robert outside their two-bedroom rental apartment in Milwaukee. Without assistance from the nonprofit Community Advocates, the family likely would have faced eviction after the pandemic forced Robert and Heavenly out of their steady jobs. Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Watch hide caption

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Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Watch

Evictions Damage Public Health. The CDC Aims To Curb Them ― For Now

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A dog dressed as Marty McFly from Back to the Future attends the Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade in 2015. New research says time travel might be possible without the problems McFly encountered. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

African Americans and other underrepresented minorities make up only about 5% of the people in genetics research studies. janiecbros/Getty Images hide caption

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janiecbros/Getty Images

Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It

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Researchers in Miami hold syringes containing either a placebo or the candidate COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna. Their work is part of a phase three clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Taimy Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Taimy Alvarez/AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention briefly posted new guidance to its website stating that the coronavirus can commonly be transmitted through aerosol particles, which can be produced by activities like singing. Here, choristers wear face masks during a music festival in southwestern France in July. Bob Edme/AP hide caption

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Bob Edme/AP

Niticia Mpanga, a registered respiratory therapist, checks on an ICU patient at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. The mortality rates from COVID-19 in ICUs have been decreasing worldwide, doctors say, at least partly because of recent advances in treatment. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

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A recent study found that when a Black newborn was cared for by a Black physician, they were less likely to experience death in the hospital setting. Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Scientists used light to control the firing of specific cells to artificially create a rhythm in the brain that acted like the drug ketamine enjoynz/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

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People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Latinos Report Financial Strain As Pandemic Erodes Income And Savings

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