Research News New advances in science, medicine, health, and technology.Stem cell research, drug research, and new treatments for disease.

A sample of cannabidiol (CBD) oil is dropped into water. Supplements containing the marijuana extract are popular and widely sold as remedies for a variety of ailments and aches. But scientific evidence that they work hasn't yet caught up for most applications, researchers say. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604307015/604854319" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a study of nearly 5,600 U.S. youths ages 12 to 17, about 6 percent say they've engaged in some sort of digital self-harm. More than half in that subgroup say they've bullied themselves this way more than once. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images

First responders in the Marina District disaster zone after an earthquake on October 17, 1989 in San Francisco, Calif. Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

Betting On Artificial Intelligence To Guide Earthquake Response

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/595564470/604423995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers used a gene-carrying virus to fix blood stem cells that were then used to treat patients with beta-thalassemia. Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

There are variations in the appearance of severely bleached corals. Here, the coral displays pink fluorescing tissue signalling heat stress. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda hide caption

toggle caption
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda

Climate Change Is Killing Coral On The Great Barrier Reef

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602995137/604119814" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How do we make sense of all that chatter? Ilana Kohn/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ilana Kohn/Getty Images

How People Learned To Recognize Monkey Calls Reveals How We All Make Sense Of Sound

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/603376389/603693230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Eddies behind an A. salina shrimp swimming Isabel Houghton / J.R. Strickler /courtesy of Stanford / University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee hide caption

toggle caption
Isabel Houghton / J.R. Strickler /courtesy of Stanford / University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Swarms Of Tiny Sea Creatures Are Powerful Enough To Mix Oceans, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602847565/603844709" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Carolina Reapers are some of the hottest peppers in the world. So hot, in fact, that for one man, participating in a pepper-eating contestant resulted in a painful, serious "thunderclap headache." Maria Dattola Photography/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maria Dattola Photography/Getty Images

The Super-Hot Pepper That Sent A Man To The ER

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601976815/602772364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings are packed into containers at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center before being taken to a U.S. Coast Guard vessel for release in Boca Raton, Fla. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Wilfredo Lee/AP

Really Random Numbers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601111484/601759949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Melodie Beckham (left), here with her daughter, Laura, had metastatic lung cancer and chose to stop taking medical marijuana after it failed to relieve her symptoms. She died a few weeks after this photo was taken. Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News