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Augustine Goba (right) heads the laboratory at Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. He and colleagues analyzed the viral genetics in blood samples from 78 Ebola patients early in the epidemic. Stephen Gire/AP hide caption

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Stephen Gire/AP

Could This Virus Be Good For You?

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Companies Wanting Immediate Sales Should Pass On Super Bowl Ads

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Nobel Prize-winning physicist Charles Townes was single-minded about a lot of things, colleagues say. And also a very nice guy. Julian Wasser/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty hide caption

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Julian Wasser/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty

Charles Townes, Laser Pioneer, Black Hole Discoverer, Dies At 99

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A couple of male, genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes take flight. Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec hide caption

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Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec

Florida Health Officials Hope To Test GMO Mosquitoes This Spring

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Bilingual Studies Reveal Flaw In How Info Reaches Mainstream

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As the U.S. workforce continues to become more diverse, researchers are now more than ever examining diversity and bias in the work place. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Study Says Creativity Can Flow From Political Correctness

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Leaks in a barrier between blood vessels and brain cells could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. VEM/Science Source hide caption

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VEM/Science Source

Leaky Blood Vessels In The Brain May Lead To Alzheimer's

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An employee of the drug company Apotex, examines some Ciprofloxacin at the plant in Canada. Cipro is commonly given to travelers for diarrhea. More than 20 million Cipro doses are prescribed each year in the U.S. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Why NFL Teams Should Reconsider Giving Coaches The Heave-Ho

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A scorpion fly perches on a leaf at the research farm where Lindgren studied the decomposition of human remains. Scorpion flies are among the first insects to visit a corpse. Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren hide caption

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Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren

An example of a human precision grip — grasping a first metacarpal from the thumb of a specimen of Australopithecus africanus that's thought to be 2 to 3 million years old. T.L. Kivell & M. Skinner hide caption

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T.L. Kivell & M. Skinner

Maybe Early Humans Weren't The First To Get A Good Grip

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Vapor from an e-cigarette obscures the user's face in a London coffee bar. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

E-Cigarettes Can Churn Out High Levels Of Formaldehyde

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Scientists reprogrammed the common bacterium E. coli so it requires a synthetic amino acid to live. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Scientists Give Genetically Modified Organisms A Safety Switch

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After Congressional Green Light, Scientists Begin Hemp Studies

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Unless there's a serious pileup, ants in traffic tend to bypass a collision and just keep going. A physicist has found a way to model this behavior with a mathematical equation. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Why Ants Handle Traffic Better Than You Do

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