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Middle Palaeolithic artifacts recently excavated from Attirampakkam, an archaeological site in present-day southern India. The artifacts suggest the technique used to make them spread across the world long before researchers previously thought. Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India/Nature hide caption

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Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India/Nature

Ocellated turkeys stand out for their bright blue heads and iridescent feathers. They're still around the Yucatan today. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Scientists zeroed in on specific neurons in the brains of mice to gain insights into how anxiety is triggered and suppressed. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Researchers Discover 'Anxiety Cells' In The Brain

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A block of Tomme de Savoie cheese ages with a sweater of Mucor lanceolatus fungal mold. Mucor itself doesn't have a strong taste, but more flavorful bacteria can travel far and wide along its hyphae — the microscopic, branched tendrils that fungi use to bring in nutrients. Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe

When Jenna Sauter's youngest son, Axel, tested positive for THC — marijuana's active ingredient — after he was born, she got a home visit from local social services. Sauter says she and her friends don't smoke near their children. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Is Smoking Pot While Pregnant Safe For The Baby?

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Nigel Raine keeps a collection of wild bees in his laboratory at the University of Guelph, in Canada. Farmed honeybees can compete with wild bees for food, making it harder for wild species to survive. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Honeybees Help Farmers, But They Don't Help The Environment

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The mummy, now identified as Anna Catharina Bischoff, was discovered in 1975. But it appears that wasn't the first time it was unearthed; researchers now believe the body was also found in 1843. Gregor Brändli/Courtesy of Naturhistorisches Museum Basel hide caption

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Gregor Brändli/Courtesy of Naturhistorisches Museum Basel

A new study finds people all over the world are able to differentiate between lullabies and dance songs from cultures they're unfamiliar with. Klubovy/Getty Images hide caption

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Klubovy/Getty Images

Lullaby Or Dance Song? Listen To Global Tunes And See If You Can Tell

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Hidden Brain: Researchers Delve Into Improving Concentration

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Evangelina Padilla-Vaccaro, now cured of a serious genetic illness — thanks to a successful stem cell treatment — playing recently in a public park. The bubble around her is just for fun. Courtesy of Alysia Padilla-Vaccaro hide caption

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Courtesy of Alysia Padilla-Vaccaro

The body's under a lot of stress during a bout of flu, doctors say. Inflammation is up and oxygen levels and blood pressure can drop. These changes can lead to an increased risk of forming blood clots in the vessels that serve the heart. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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laflor/Getty Images

Flu Virus Can Trigger A Heart Attack

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Zhong Zhong (left) and Hua Hua are the first primate clones made by somatic cell nuclear transfer, the same process that created Dolly the sheep in 1996. Qiang Sun and Mu-ming Poo/Chinese Academy of Sciences/Cell Press hide caption

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Qiang Sun and Mu-ming Poo/Chinese Academy of Sciences/Cell Press

Chinese Scientists Clone Monkeys Using Method That Created Dolly The Sheep

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Microorganisms play a vital role in growing food and sustaining the planet, but they do it anonymously. Scientists haven't identified most soil microbes, but they are learning which are most common. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Scientists Peek Inside The 'Black Box' Of Soil Microbes To Learn Their Secrets

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Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

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