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Budget cutbacks threaten a planned upgrade of the massive Titan supercomputer, seen here, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Charles Brooks/Oak Ridge National Laboratory hide caption

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Charles Brooks/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Science On Shaky Ground As Automatic Budget Cutbacks Drag On

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Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

This riboflavin-rich material can be used to print intricate, microscopic structures in three dimensions. Courtesy of North Carolina State University hide caption

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Courtesy of North Carolina State University

NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer probe, seen in this artist's rendering, is orbiting the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar surface. Dana Berry/NASA hide caption

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Dana Berry/NASA

Netflix On The Moon? Broadband Makes It To Deep Space

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Maybe someday Jerry won't be laughing at George's follicularly challenged scalp. But despite scientific advances there's still no cure for baldness. NBC/NBC via Getty Images hide caption

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NBC/NBC via Getty Images

Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes severe diarrhea, can be difficult to treat with antibiotics. Stefan Hyman/University of Leicester hide caption

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Stefan Hyman/University of Leicester

Researchers excavated the remains of five creatures who lived 1.8 million years ago, including this adult male skull. The excavation site, in Georgia in the former Soviet Union, was home to a remarkable cache of bones. Courtesy of Georgian National Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of Georgian National Museum
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep

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