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This 1933 photo made available by the U.S. Geological Survey shows the ruins of St. Anthony's Church in Long Beach, Calif., after an earthquake struck on March 10, 1933. T.J. Maher/AP hide caption

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T.J. Maher/AP

A new study says campaign ads in battleground states also impact contributions. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Social Science Research Behind Political Campaign Ads

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Giant sequoias in the Sierra Nevada range can grow to be 250 feet tall — or more. John Buie/Flickr hide caption

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John Buie/Flickr

How Is A 1,600-Year-Old Tree Weathering California's Drought?

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Placebos are commonly thought of as fake treatments that people think are real. But they may be helpful even if you know they're fake. Tim Robberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Robberts/Getty Images

Joseph Blackman, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, at work in Miami. Mosquitoes infected with Zika are now spreading the illness in at least four different parts of the city, according to federal health officials. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Zika May Be In The U.S. To Stay

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Men protesting in support of more money for AIDS research marched down Fifth Avenue during the 14th annual Lesbian and Gay Pride parade in New York in 1983. Mario Suriani/AP hide caption

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Mario Suriani/AP

Researchers Clear 'Patient Zero' From AIDS Origin Story

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Our culture has long expected that women will be kind, and leaders will be authoritative. So what's a female leader to do when she confronts these conflicting stereotypes? Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

'Double Bind' Explains The Dearth Of Women In Top Leadership Positions

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Cori Bargmann is applying her training as a neuroscientist to shaping the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative's ambitious agenda. Chan Zuckerberg Initiative hide caption

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Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

Applying A Silicon Valley Approach To Jump-Start Medical Research

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Newborn baby is shown sleeping on a bed. A new report says it's much safer for a baby to sleep alone on a crib with no pillows or blankets. Purestock/Getty Images/Purestock hide caption

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Purestock/Getty Images/Purestock

Pediatricians realize parents need strategies beyond "Put down that phone!" Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

No Snapchat In The Bedroom? An Online Tool To Manage Kids' Media Use

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