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Monsoon rains flooded Mumbai in August 2017. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can spread diseases like dengue fever. Drought has affected the health of Somalians. (From left) Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images; Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images; Arif Hudaverdi Yaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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(From left) Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images; Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images; Arif Hudaverdi Yaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

How Climate Change Is Already Affecting Health, Spreading Disease

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Brain Patterns May Predict People At Risk Of Suicide

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Shankar Vedantam, NPR's social science correspondent and host of the Hidden Brain podcast, explains why some of us are really good at recognizing faces and others are not. John Lamb/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamb/Getty Images

We're Not As Good At Remembering Faces As We Think We Are

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The Sissano Lagoon was part of Papua New Guinea devastated by a tsunami in 1998. Researchers used evidence from after that tsunami to compare to a tsunami thousands of years ago. Channel 7 TV Sydney via AP hide caption

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Channel 7 TV Sydney via AP

VA Examines Link Between Blast Exposure And Lung Injuries

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Kolbi Brown (left), a program manager at Harlem Hospital in New York, helps Karen Phillips sign up to receive more information about the All of Us medical research program, during a block party outside the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Troubling History In Medical Research Still Fresh For Black Americans

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Researchers injected dye into this human neuron to reveal its shape. Allen Institute hide caption

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Allen Institute

Scientists And Surgeons Team Up To Create Virtual Human Brain Cells

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A scans of the astrolabe reveal not only the emblems on its face (left) but also the degree markings (right) that would have aided sailors in navigation. University of Warwick hide caption

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University of Warwick

Screening for Type 2 diabetes involves a blood test, and if results are concerning a second test is recommended. ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images

Scientists have used a new gene-editing technique to create pigs that can keep their bodies warmer, burning more fat to produce leaner meat. Infrared pictures of 6-month-old pigs taken at zero, two, and four hours after cold exposure show that the pigs' thermoregulation was improved after insertion of the new gene. The modified pigs are on the right side of the images. Zheng et al. / PNAS hide caption

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Zheng et al. / PNAS

CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs

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Want to get smarter? Brain training games don't seem to help with that. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

In Memory Training Smackdown, One Method Dominates

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Lindsay Cristides, a master's student in oceanography at Texas A&M University, anchors a research vessel in the Houston Ship Channel before taking samples of sediment left behind by Hurricane Harvey floods. The samples will be tested for contaminants including heavy metals. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Digging In The Mud To See What Toxic Substances Were Spread By Hurricane Harvey

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