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Cancer of the cervix is one of the most common cancers affecting women and can be fatal. Here, cervical cancer cells are dividing, as seen through a colored scanning electron micrograph. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival

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Arrangement of colored oviraptor-like eggs in an oviraptorid nest arrangement Jasmina Wiemann/Yale University hide caption

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Jasmina Wiemann/Yale University

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs

A new study found that birds' dinosaur relatives had eggs with traces of two pigments—a red-brown one and a blue-green one. In today's birds that might produce a color such as robin's egg blue.

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs

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Social Stigma Is One Reason The Opioid Crisis Is Hard To Confront

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New research explores how people think autonomous vehicles should handle moral dilemmas. Here, people walk in front of an autonomous taxi being demonstrated in Frankfurt, Germany, last year. Andreas Arnold/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Arnold/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Connor Webb and his mother, Kim Webb, stand outside of their home in Huntington Beach, Calif. Connor was treated for a rare cancer at 16. He's well now but his mother is fighting for new cures in case the cancer comes back. Alex Welsh for NPR hide caption

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Alex Welsh for NPR

The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

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The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project says the intact shipwreck was discovered at a depth of more than 1 mile, where the scarcity of oxygen helped preserve the ancient vessel. Black Sea MAP/EEF Expeditions hide caption

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Black Sea MAP/EEF Expeditions

Microplastics are not just showing up on beaches like this one in the Canary Islands — a very small study shows that they are in human waste in many parts of the world. Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images

A major study published Monday finds that widely prescribed antipsychotic drugs like haloperidol are no more effective than a placebo for treating delirium. Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images hide caption

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Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium

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When you get hearing aids, it can help you stay more stimulated and socially engaged. Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears

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University of Oregon scientists used real dust from inside homes around Portland to test the effects of sunlight, UV light and darkness on bacteria found in the dust. Dave G Kelly/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave G Kelly/Getty Images

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The U.S. Department of Agriculture this week approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people. Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University hide caption

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Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat

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A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone. While most of the structures point in one direction, the red arrow shows that some point in the other direction. Courtesy of Abigail Allwood hide caption

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Courtesy of Abigail Allwood

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' In 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks

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