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Climate models project 21st century global temperatures. NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and NASA Center for Climate Simulation hide caption

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NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and NASA Center for Climate Simulation

Big Data Predicts Centuries Of Harm If Climate Warming Goes Unchecked

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Delegates from about 170 countries gathered in Kyoto in December 1997 during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. This year in Paris, the stakes are even higher, negotiators say. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Kyoto Treaty Fizzled, But Climate Talkers Insist Paris Is Different

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The Psychological Dimension Behind Climate Negotiations

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Despite a desire for government services, Americans in a new poll were clearly dissatisfied with the level of service they feel they receive. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Poll: 1 In 5 Americans Trusts The Government

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A group at MIT built this tiny package of sensors to collect vital signs as it travels through the digestive system. Albert Swiston/MIT hide caption

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Albert Swiston/MIT

A Tiny Pill Monitors Vital Signs From Deep Inside The Body

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There's More To Wage Cuts Than Just Lost Pay

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Natural History Museums Rife With Mislabeled Specimens, Researchers Find

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People who drank three to five cups of coffee per day had a lower risk of premature death than those who didn't drink, a new study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Drink To Your Health: Study Links Daily Coffee Habit To Longevity

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An image from the Allen Institute's Brain Explorer shows gene expression across the human brain. Courtesy of Allen Institute For Brain Science hide caption

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Courtesy of Allen Institute For Brain Science

A Genetic Map Hints At What Makes A Brain Human

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Kate Teague, a registered nurse at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, in Palo Alto, Calif., holds a premature baby's hand. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

In Caring For Sickest Babies, Doctors Now Tap Parents For Tough Calls

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Omar looks through Kai's photo book. The charges for the infant's six months of care in the neonatal intensive care unit totaled about $11 million, according to the family, though their insurer very likely negotiated a lower rate. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

An Ill Newborn, A Loving Family And A Litany Of Wrenching Choices

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Despite Encouragement To Eat Better, Obesity Rises Among U.S. Adults

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Can Life Insurance Affect The Propensity To Commit Suicide?

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