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An Egyptian fruit bat flies in an abandoned quarry near the village of Mammari, Cyprus, in 2007. Alex Mita/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When Bats Squeak, They Tend To Squabble

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Diseased brain tissue from an Alzheimer's patient showing amyloid plaques (in blue) located in the gray matter of the brain. Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Danish Study Links Fish Oil During Pregnancy With Lower Asthma Risk In Kids

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How Do You Keep From Getting Bored? Researchers Have An Answer

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Short On Data, EPA's Final Report On Fracking Leaves Many Disheartened

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Big Leaps In Gene Editing Raise Ethical Questions About Human Application

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If you judge a person based simply on a picture and then later on have an interaction with that person, do you think you would revise your judgments? Thomas Barwick/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers Examine Whether First Impressions Are Lasting

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Knowing Someone Who Faced Discrimination May Affect Blood Pressure

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How Much Is Too Much? New Study Casts Doubts On Sugar Guidelines

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A tiny radio receiver built from components the size of two atoms. It emits a signal as red light, which is then converted into an electrical current and can be broadcast as sound by a speaker or headphone. Eliza Grinnell/Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences hide caption

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Eliza Grinnell/Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

This Christmas Song Brought To You By The World's Tiniest Radio Receiver

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