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Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Home For The Holidays? Get Off The Couch!

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The Haunting Effects Of Going Days Without Sleep

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Why A Creatively Wrapped Gift Could Lead To Disappointment

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Gene Editing Experiments In Mice May Help People Hear Too

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Jocelyne Bloch: The Brain May Be Able To Repair Itself — With Help Courtesy of Jocelyne Bloch hide caption

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Courtesy of Jocelyne Bloch

Jocelyne Bloch: After An Injury, Can The Brain Heal Itself?

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How Humans Use 'Strategic Ignorance' When Facts Get In The Way

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Why Some Cities Are Better Than Others At Avoiding Gridlock

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Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevent A Form Of Deafness In Mice

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Studying the penis of a thistle tortoise beetle may lead to a better design for medical catheters. Yoko Matsumura, Alexander Kovalev, Stanislav N. Gorb/Science Advances hide caption

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Yoko Matsumura, Alexander Kovalev, Stanislav N. Gorb/Science Advances

Samantha Pierce of Cleveland has a 7-year-old daughter, Camryn. In 2009, Pierce gave premature birth to twins. The babies did not survive. Scientists say black women lead more stressful lives, which makes them more likely to give birth prematurely and puts their babies at risk of dying. Dustin Franz for NPR hide caption

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Dustin Franz for NPR

How Racism May Cause Black Mothers To Suffer The Death Of Their Infants

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A cocoa farmer opens cacao pods with a stick to collect cocoa beans at his farm in Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images

Health workers killed chickens in a Hong Kong market in 2014 in an effort to stop the spread of H7N9 flu. It's being watched closely as a virus that might spark a pandemic outbreak. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

NIH Lifts Ban On Research That Could Make Deadly Viruses Even Worse

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