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Gerbils are harmless... Right? Peter Knight/Flickr hide caption

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Peter Knight/Flickr

Rats Blamed For Bubonic Plague, But Gerbils May Be The Real Villains

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Students Patrick Rohrer, Sarah Warthen, Alix Piven and Lauren Urane are led by Mercyhurst University Archeologist Andy Hemmings. Their project has picked up where Florida's State Geologist Elias Sellards left off in 1915. Sellards led an excavation of the site where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized human remains. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

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Science Says The Dress Is Blue

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A field of unharvested wheat is seen in Ashby-de-la-Zouch, England, in 2012. Wheat wasn't cultivated in Britain until some 6,000 years ago, but DNA evidence suggests early Britons were eating the grain at least 8,000 years ago. Darren Staples/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Darren Staples/Reuters/Landov

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

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An overgrowth of Clostridium difficile bacteria can inflame the colon with a life-threatening infection. Dr. David Phillips/Getty Images/Visuals Unlimited hide caption

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Dr. David Phillips/Getty Images/Visuals Unlimited

How Peer Pressure May Encourage Tax Delinquents To Pay Up

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Who, me? The Asian relative of this domestic gerbil is a well-known host to the bacteria that cause plague. Valentina Storti/Flickr hide caption

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Valentina Storti/Flickr

Gerbils Likely Pushed Plague To Europe in Middle Ages

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Burmese migrant Thazin Mon Htay and her father Ko Ngwe Htay were trafficked to Thailand to peel shrimp. They worked 16-hour shifts, seven days a week, for less than $10 a day, Ko Ngwe told PBS NewsHour. Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR hide caption

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Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR

Botanists say this plant is the fern equivalent of a human-lemur love child. Harry Roskam hide caption

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Harry Roskam

'Weird' Fern Shows The Power Of Interspecies Sex

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In a landmark new study, researchers found that babies who consumed the equivalent of about 4 heaping teaspoons of peanut butter each week, starting when they were between 4 and 11 months old, were about 80 percent less likely to develop a peanut allergy by age 5. To avoid a choking hazard, doctors say kids should be fed peanuts mixed in other foods, not peanuts or globs of peanut butter. Anna/Flickr hide caption

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Anna/Flickr

Feeding Babies Foods With Peanuts Appears To Prevent Allergies

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Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Kids, Allergies And A Possible Downside To Squeaky Clean Dishes

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It's a good start when experimental compounds stop the proliferation of cancer cells in the lab. But, as many researchers have learned the hard way, that's just an early step toward creating a worthwhile treatment. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

A Biological Quest Leads To A New Kind Of Breast Cancer Drug

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The size of the brain of a chimpanzee (right) is considerably smaller than that of a human brain. Probably multiple stretches of DNA help determine that, geneticists say. Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Corbis

Just A Bit Of DNA Helps Explain Humans' Big Brains

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iStockphoto

Pain Really Is All In Your Head And Emotion Controls Intensity

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