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A new study suggests Risso's dolphins, which are common along the U.S. Pacific Coast, use past experiences to plan their dives for food. Elizabeth Haslam/Flickr hide caption

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Elizabeth Haslam/Flickr

Risso's Dolphin Group

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A study in mice suggests that our brains tell us when to start and stop drinking long before our bodies are fully hydrated. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

Still Thirsty? It's Up To Your Brain, Not Your Body

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Melanie White takes photos of North Atlantic right whales from NOAA's Twin Otter as the plane circles the whales near Savannah. Whale observers and researchers use the photos to identify the whales. Molly Samuel/WABE hide caption

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Molly Samuel/WABE

Researchers Haven't Found A Single Endangered Right Whale Calf Yet This Season

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It's easy to mistake adolescent depression for something else, child psychiatrists say; the signs can include misbehavior, eating problems or sleep trouble. Johner Bildbyra/Getty Images hide caption

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Johner Bildbyra/Getty Images

Pediatricians Call For Universal Depression Screening For Teens

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When wildfire smoke choked their community last summer, Amy Cilimburg (left), the director of Climate Smart Missoula, helped Joy and Don Dunagan, of Seeley Lake, Mont., get a HEPA air filter through a partnership with the Missoula City-County Health Department. Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio

When Wildfire Smoke Invades, Who Should Pay To Clean Indoor Air?

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Wildfire smoke filled the sky in Seeley Lake, Mont. on Aug. 7, 2017. Weather effects concentrated the accumulating smoke, chronically exposing residents to harmful substances in the air. InciWeb hide caption

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InciWeb

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

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A scientist says pen refill reviews on Amazon are more informative that what the current peer review system offers on scientific work costing millions of dollars. Mark Airs/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

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Ashley Copeland (right) talks to her mom Sue Iverson in the Swedish Medical Center emergency department, near Denver. Copeland got a nerve-blocking anesthetic instead of opioids to ease her severe headache. At discharge she was advised to use over-the-counter painkillers, if necessary. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

These 10 ERs Sharply Reduced Opioid Use And Still Eased Pain

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A global map showing where all fishing vessels were active during 2016. Dark circles show the vessels avoiding exclusive economic zones around islands, where they aren't allowed. Global Fishing Watch hide caption

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Global Fishing Watch

Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Kristopher Kelly near his home in Concrete, Wash., in February. He broke his pelvis and all his ribs in a work accident last year. The resulting infection he developed in the hospital almost killed him. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Did An IV Cocktail Of Vitamins And Drugs Save This Lumberjack From Sepsis?

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Shaorong Deng gets an experimental treatment for cancer of the esophagus that uses his own immune system cells. They have been genetically modified with the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR. Yuhan Xu/NPR hide caption

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Yuhan Xu/NPR

Doctors In China Lead Race To Treat Cancer By Editing Genes

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Hidden Brain: A Study Of Airline Delays

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Virginia Harrod, an attorney and county prosecutor who lives in rural Kentucky, survived breast cancer, only to develop lymphedema, which sent her to the hospital three times with serious infections. A lymph node transplant helped restore her immune system. Luke Sharrett for NPR hide caption

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Luke Sharrett for NPR

She Survived Breast Cancer, But Says A Treatment Side Effect 'Almost Killed' Her

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV vaccination at Amistad Community Health Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 2016. Though gender differences in vaccine rates have narrowed, more girls than boys tend to get immunized against HPV. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get It

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