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The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Lishman/Getty Images

One of the first images of a living Wallace's giant bee was captured after a recent rediscovery of the world's largest bee in Indonesia. As this composite image illustrates, the bee is approximately four times larger than a European honeybee. Clay Bolt/claybolt.com hide caption

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Clay Bolt/claybolt.com

Genetically modified "gene drive" mosquitoes feed on warm cow's blood. Scientists hope these mosquitoes could help eradicate malaria. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab

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Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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Volunteers Fight Bad Science

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Dramatic decreases in deaths from lung cancer among African-Americans were particularly notable, according to the American Cancer Society. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

Scientists around the world criticized Chinese researcher He Jiankui's experimental editing of DNA in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

In 2011, a 17-year-old named Mishka told readers of his Facebook post that his Salem, Ore., high school was "asking for a f***ing shooting." That post and other furious outbursts triggered a quick, but deep evaluation by the school district's threat assessment unit. Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

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A white-tailed deer keeps its ears open while grazing in South Hero, Vt. Rob Swanson/AP hide caption

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Rob Swanson/AP

Hungry Deer May Be Changing How Things Sound In The Forest

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Scientists have isolated a molecule with disease-fighting potential in a microbe living on a type of fungus-farming ant (genus Cyphomyrmex). The microbe kills off other hostile microbes attacking the ants' fungus, a food source. Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin

Images of the object nicknamed Ultima Thule photographed from the New Horizons spacecraft on Jan. 1. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Getty Images

A researcher examines the underwater hull of the USS Hornet CV-8, which played a role in several key events of World War II. Photo courtesy of Paul G. Allen's Vulcan Inc hide caption

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Photo courtesy of Paul G. Allen's Vulcan Inc

Why Morning People May Have A Health Edge Over Night People

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Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

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