Research News New advances in science, medicine, health, and technology.Stem cell research, drug research, and new treatments for disease.

Research News

The Allen Institute for Brain Science hosted its first BigNeuron Hackathon in Beijing earlier this month. Similar events are planned for the U.S. and U.K. Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science

Hackers Teach Computers To Tell Healthy And Sick Brain Cells Apart

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/396586398/396637006" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturn has a rocky surface, but it's deep beneath the clouds. That makes it hard to tell exactly how long the day is. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

A Day's A Day The World Around — But Shorter On Saturn

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395378994/395966202" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Smart phones contain a silicon chip inside the camera that might be used to detect rare, high energy particles from outer space. J. Yang/Courtesy of WIPAC hide caption

toggle caption
J. Yang/Courtesy of WIPAC

Want To Do A Little Astrophysics? This App Detects Cosmic Rays

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395800694/396405106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A 2008 view of the leading edge of the Larsen B ice shelf, extending into the northwest part of the Weddell Sea. Huge, floating ice shelves that line the Antarctic coast help hold back sheets of ice that cover land. Mariano Caravaca /Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Mariano Caravaca /Reuters/Landov

Big Shelves Of Antarctic Ice Melting Faster Than Scientists Thought

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395379216/395604776" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A simulation from the Neitz lab of what colorblindness looks like, with normal color vision on the left and red-green colorblindness on the right. Courtesy of Neitz Laboratory hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Neitz Laboratory

University And Biotech Firm Team Up On Colorblindness Therapy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395303785/395355187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Water molecules between two layers of graphene arranged themselves in a lattice of squares — unlike any other known form of ice. NPG Press via YouTube hide caption

toggle caption
NPG Press via YouTube

Scientists Discover A New Form Of Ice — It's Square

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395127577/395355175" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Safe and small: The credit-card-sized test for anthrax destroys the deadly bacteria after the test completes. Courtesy of Sandia Nation hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Sandia Nation

Safer Anthrax Test Aims To Keep The Bioweapon From Terrorists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395238617/395238618" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How Money Managers' Personal Lives Affect Your Investments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395001579/395001580" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When combined with results of other neurological tests, and in the context of a thorough medical history, atrophy of the brain (shown here in an MRI scan) sometimes indicates Alzheimer's. Simon Fraser/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Simon Fraser/Science Source

Many Doctors Who Diagnose Alzheimer's Fail To Tell The Patient

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394927484/395001635" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Both James Eversull (left) and Pat Patchell were treated with experimental chemotherapy and radiation for leukemia as children in the 1960s. Together, they're now some of the country's oldest leukemia survivors.. Courtesy of James Eversull; Courtesy of Pat Patchell hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of James Eversull; Courtesy of Pat Patchell

How 2 Children With Leukemia Helped Transform Its Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394897664/395001665" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Johnny Reynolds ignored diabetes symptoms and put off going to the doctor for years when he didn't have health insurance. He was afraid he couldn't afford treatment. Anders Kelto/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anders Kelto/NPR

States That Expand Medicaid Detect More Cases Of Diabetes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394836516/394906641" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Why The War On Cancer Hasn't Been Won

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394132747/394906617" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript