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A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Dr. Dorry Segev (right), of Johns Hopkins Medicine, led the team of doctors that transplanted an HIV-positive liver and kidney into two different HIV-positive patients this month. Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Medicine

New Source Of Transplant Organs For Patients With HIV: Others With HIV

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Fatty plaque (shown here in yellow) blocks about 60 percent of this coronary artery's width. The increasing thickness of artery walls is just one factor that can increase vulnerability to a heart attack or stroke. Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source hide caption

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Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source

Possible Heart Benefits Of Taking Estrogen Get Another Look

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Paul Hornback was a senior engineer and analyst for the U.S. Army when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease six years ago at age 55. His wife, Sarah, had to retire 18 months ago to care for him full time. Courtesy of the Hornbeck family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Hornbeck family

Big Financial Costs Are Part Of Alzheimer's Toll On Families

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Large cracks in the sidewalk in Coyle, Okla., appeared after several earthquakes on Jan. 24. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

U.S. Geology Maps Reveal Areas Vulnerable To Man-Made Quakes

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Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

A Crisis With Scant Data: States Move To Count Drug-Dependent Babies

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Scientists Build A Live, No-Frills Cell That Could Have A Big Future

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In 2010, scientists plopped the genetic material of one Mycoplasma bacterium into another type to create the self-replicating cells shown above. Six years later, they've come out with an even simpler synthetic organism that has fewer genes. Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/Science Source hide caption

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Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/Science Source

Scientists Build A Live, No-Frills Cell That Could Have A Big Future

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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Public Health Image Library/CDC

Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger

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Studies Suggest Multilingual Exposure Boosts Children's Communication Skills

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A Martian gravity map shows the Tharsis volcanoes and surrounding flexure. The white areas in the center are higher-gravity regions produced by the massive Tharsis volcanoes, and the surrounding blue areas are lower-gravity regions that may be cracks in the crust (lithosphere). MIT/UMBC-CRESST/GSFC via NASA hide caption

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MIT/UMBC-CRESST/GSFC via NASA

Standing water and abandoned tires make Houston's Fifth Ward hospitable for mosquitoes. Courtesy of Anna Grove Photography hide caption

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Courtesy of Anna Grove Photography

Houston Prepares Now For Zika's Potential Arrival This Summer

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A worker cuts a cluster of grapes in the Burgundy region of France during the harvest period. Global warming has made conditions historically associated with great wines more frequent in Bordeaux and Burgundy, a study finds. But things look less bright for California vineyards. Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images

"I am the first scientist to be given the shaman's blessing to study their site." — Andrés Ruzo James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Andrés Ruzo: Could A Boiling River From A Childhood Legend Exist?

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