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Would having to wait 25 seconds for your snack prompt you to make healthier choices at the vending machine? New research suggests the answer is yes. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

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Vials of the HPV vaccination drug Gardasil. Doctors and public health experts say the new version of the vaccine could protect more people against cancer. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Spraying sea salt into the atmosphere to increase the reflective cloud cover over oceans is the way some scientists think they might be able to bring down Earth's temperature. At least they'd like to safely test the idea on a small scale. Pixza/Getty Images hide caption

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Pixza/Getty Images

Scientists Who Want To Study Climate Engineering Shun Trump

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Bill Kochevar received an implanted brain-recording and muscle-stimulating system that allowed him to move limbs he hadn't been able to move in eight years. Cleveland FES Center hide caption

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Cleveland FES Center

Paralyzed Man Uses Thoughts To Control His Own Arm And Hand

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EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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Dan Ariely has found that "what separates honest people from not-honest people is not necessarily character, it's opportunity." Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The Truth Is, Lying Might Not Be So Bad

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There's overwhelming consensus that breast-feeding is the optimal way to feed an infant. But the topic of how breast-feeding may influence cognitive ability is controversial. Guerilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Guerilla/Getty Images

Breast-Fed Kids May Be Less Hyper, But Not Necessarily Smarter, Study Finds

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Nearly two-thirds of cell mutations that cause cancer are caused by random error, a study found. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

Cancer Is Partly Caused By Bad Luck, Study Finds

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A new study shows that when infants and young children grow up in households without enough to eat, they are more likely to perform poorly at school years later. Daniel Fishel for NPR hide caption

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Daniel Fishel for NPR
Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

How The 'Scarcity Mindset' Can Make Problems Worse

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Brookings Papers on Economic Activity

The Forces Driving Middle-Aged White People's 'Deaths Of Despair'

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