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A female Scandinavian brown bear with her cub. Mother bears take care of their young for a year longer, likely due to hunting regulations that protect bears with cubs. Ilpo Kojola/Nature hide caption

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Ilpo Kojola/Nature

Mother Bears Are Staying With Their Cubs Longer, Study Finds

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The Great Pacific Garbage 'Patch' Much Bigger Than Previously Thought

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CDC Now Has Authority To Research Gun Violence. What's Next?

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SoFi, the robotic fish, swims in for its close-up. MIT computer scientists hope SoFi will help marine biologists get a closer (and less obtrusive) look at their subjects than ever before. Robert Katzschmann et al. (Photo: Joseph DelPreto)/MIT CSAIL hide caption

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Robert Katzschmann et al. (Photo: Joseph DelPreto)/MIT CSAIL

A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of the surface of the human tongue. Taste buds are shown in purple. Doctors have known that as people pack on the pounds, their sense of taste diminishes. New research in mice suggests one reason why: Inflammation brought on by obesity may be killing taste buds. Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source

Why Some Men Have A Harder Time Confiding In Others

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Wendy Root Askew with her husband Dominick Askew and their son. When the little boy (now 6) was born, Root Askew struggled with postpartum depression. She likes California's bill, she says, because it goes beyond mandatory screening; it would also require insurers to establish programs to help women get treatment. Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew

Lawmakers Weigh Pros And Cons Of Mandatory Screening For Postpartum Depression

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Scientists are finding that, just as with secondhand smoke from tobacco, inhaling secondhand smoke from marijuana can make it harder for arteries to expand to allow a healthy flow of blood. Maren Caruso/Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Caruso/Getty Images

Are There Risks From Secondhand Marijuana Smoke? Early Science Says Yes

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Colored transmission electron micrograph of a section through an Escherichia coli bacterium. This rod-shaped bacterium moves via its hair-like flagellae (yellow). Kwangshin Kim/Science Source hide caption

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Kwangshin Kim/Science Source