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Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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A female adult head louse clings to a hair plucked from a human scalp. The brown line visible inside the insect, on the left side of its body, is its last blood meal. Lice typically eat a few times a day. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED
Ran Zheng for NPR

Sparkle Unicorns And Fart Ninjas: What Parents Can Do About Gendered Toys

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Duke University is paying the U.S. $112.5 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by submitting falsified research data to win or keep federal grants. Here, a photo shows the Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C., in 2008, when some of the fraud was alleged to have taken place. Chris Keane/Reuters hide caption

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Chris Keane/Reuters

Simon Walker, a student at the Bern University of the Arts in Switzerland, checks a small music speaker placed directly below a wheel of Emmental. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

Need A Can't-Miss Wheel Of Cheese? Try Playing It Some Hip-Hop

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Authorities intercepted a woman using this drug kit in preparation for shooting up a mix of heroin and fentanyl inside a Walmart bathroom last month in Manchester, N.H. Fentanyl offers a particularly potent high but also can shut down breathing in under a minute. Salwan Georges/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/Washington Post/Getty Images

Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave Begins

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Researchers Examine Who's Better At College Basketball's Free-Throw Line

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Marijuana plants grow in a marijuana cultivation facility on July 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut

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Google Employee Is Credited With Calculating Most Accurate Value Of Pi

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A biomechanical model of producing an "f" sound with an overbite (left) compared with an edge-to-edge bite (right). Some linguists are arguing that the advent of softer food thousands of years ago led to changes in biting patterns and, eventually, to more frequent use of sounds like "f" and "v" in human languages. Scott Moisik hide caption

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Scott Moisik

There was an uproar in 2018 when a scientist in China, He Jiankui, announced that he had successfully used CRISPR to edit the genes of twin girls when they were embryos. Prominent scientists hope to stop further attempts at germline editing, at least for now. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies

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An artist's rendering shows a needle-like carbon nanotube delivering DNA through the wall of a plant cell. It also may be possible to use this method to inject a gene editing tool called CRISPR to alter a plant's characteristics for breeding. Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry hide caption

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Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry

Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants

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Jonah Reeder prepares a special protein shake that helps him manage a metabolic condition called phenylketonuria. Julia Ritchey/KUER hide caption

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Julia Ritchey/KUER

A Gulp Of Genetically Modified Bacteria Might Someday Treat A Range Of Illnesses

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