Research News New advances in science, medicine, health, and technology.Stem cell research, drug research, and new treatments for disease.

An artist's rendering of the newly named Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory hide caption

toggle caption
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

NASA Plans To Launch A Probe Next Year To 'Touch The Sun'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/530743287/530929971" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/530224517/530769881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The good old reflex hammer (like this Taylor model) might seem like an outdated medical device, but its role in diagnosing disease is still as important as ever. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A tractor pulls a planter while distributing corn seed on a field in Malden, Ill. Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sometime between grade school and grad school, the brain's information highways get remapped in a way that dramatically boosts self-control. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

As Brains Mature, More Robust Information Networks Boost Self-Control

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529828305/530257570" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Daniel Fishel for NPR

Eating Chocolate, A Little Each Week, May Lower The Risk Of A Heart Flutter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529843647/529893167" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A groundskeeper at Pinecrest Gardens sprays pesticide to kill mosquitoes in Miami-Dade County, Fla., in 2016. Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

John Goodenough's work led to the lithium-ion battery, now found in everything from phones to electric cars. He and fellow researchers at the University of Texas, Austin say they've come up with a faster-charging alternative. Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT hide caption

toggle caption
Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

At 94, Lithium-Ion Pioneer Eyes A New Longer-Lasting Battery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529116034/529550337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For children over 1 year old, pediatricians strongly recommend whole fruit instead of juice, because it contains fiber, which slows the absorption of sugar and fills you up the way juice doesn't. KathyDewar/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
KathyDewar/Getty Images

Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron that injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

toggle caption
Wikimedia

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528966102/529364560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528646323/529257424" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript