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Endophytes are microbes that live inside plants — the ones tagged with a fluorescent dye in this image are found in poplars. The microbes gather nitrogen from the air, turning it into a form plants can use, a process called nitrogen fixation. Researchers are looking at how these microbes could be used to help crops like rice and corn make their own fertilizer. Sam Scharffenberger hide caption

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Sam Scharffenberger
Mike Powell/Getty Images

Baseball Umpires Don't Get Overtime. Does That Affect Extra Innings?

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"If my life were to end next week ... I want to feel like I have made a contribution," said Carol Martin, seen here holding her 2018 Boston Marathon medal. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

If you are bitten by a Lone Star tick, you could develop an unusual allergy to red meat. And as this tick's territory spreads beyond the Southeast, the allergy seems to be spreading with it. Robert Noonan/Science Source hide caption

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Robert Noonan/Science Source

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

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A vaccine given during pregnancy protects the baby against whooping cough, but only about 50 percent of pregnant women get it. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Pregnant Women: Avoid Soft Cheeses, But Do Get These Shots

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How Police Killings Lead To Poor Mental Health In The Black Community

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Dr. Vinay Prasad is 35 and an assistant professor of medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, where he researches health policy, the high cost of drugs and evidence-based medicine. He has more than 21,000 followers on Twitter. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Tweeting Oncologist Draws Ire And Admiration For Calling Out Hype

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A Miami-Dade County mosquito control worker sprays around a home in August 2016 in the Wynwood area of Miami. A University of Florida study recently identified the first known human case of the mosquito-borne Keystone virus. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

The northern white-cheeked gibbon is a critically endangered ape native to China, Vietnam and Laos. Scientists have discovered a new species of gibbon, now extinct, that lived in China as recently as 2,200 years ago. Joachim S. Müller/Flickr hide caption

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Joachim S. Müller/Flickr

Several circular herpes virus particles are seen near a cell membrane. Roseola herpes virus causes a childhood illness marked by skin rashes and now has been found in brains with Alzheimer's disease. NCI/Science Source hide caption

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NCI/Science Source

Researchers Find Herpes Viruses In Brains Marked By Alzheimer's Disease

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In these two two-cell mouse embryos, the surface of the embryos is outlined in orange, the DNA in the nucleus is indicated in blue and the activity of the LINE-1 gene is indicated via bright red spots. Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF hide caption

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Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF

Some DNA Dismissed As 'Junk' Is Crucial To Embryo Development

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Koko, the gorilla who became an ambassador to the human world through her ability to communicate, has died. She's seen here at age 4, telling psychologist Francine "Penny" Patterson (left) that she is hungry. In the center is June Monroe, an interpreter for the deaf at St. Luke's Church, who helped teach Koko. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

The Telstar 18 is the official match ball for the 2018 World Cup in Russia. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

The Science Behind The World Cup Ball

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A study finds light drinkers have the lowest combined risk of getting cancer and dying prematurely — lower than nondrinkers. Alcohol is estimated to be the third-largest contributor to overall cancer deaths. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Drinking Alcohol Can Raise Cancer Risk. How Much Is Too Much?

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