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In addition to profound exhaustion that isn't relieved with sleep, the illness now called ME/CFS includes flu-like symptoms, muscle pain, "brain fog" and various other physical symptoms, all of which typically worsen with even minor exertion. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images

Although consuming cannabis is legal in Colorado and several other states, driving while under the influence of the drug is not. Nick Pedersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Pedersen/Getty Images

Scientists Still Seek A Reliable DUI Test For Marijuana

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Rats and people may rely on "metamemory" in a variety of different ways, scientists say. For a rat, it's likely about knowing whether you remember that predator in the distance; for people, knowing what we don't know helps us navigate social interactions. fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Rats To Humans, A Brain Knows When It Can't Remember

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The defensive mucus of the Arion subfuscus slug has inspired materials scientists trying to invent better medical adhesives. Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images hide caption

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Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images

Slug Slime Inspires Scientists To Invent Sticky Surgical Glue

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A growing number of pediatric sports medicine groups warn that when a child focuses on a single sport before age 15 or 16, they increase their risk of injury and burnout — and don't boost their overall success in that sport. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Student Athletes Who Specialize Early Are Injured More Often, Study Finds

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Hidden Brain: How Cigarette Taxes Affect Food Buying

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Professional fighter Gina Mazany practices during a training session at Xtreme Couture Mixed Martial Arts in Las Vegas. She well remembers her first concussion — which came in her first fight. "I was throwing up that night," Mazany says. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

Female Athletes Are Closing The Gender Gap When It Comes To Concussions

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Researchers Map More Of The Ocean Floor In Search For Missing Plane

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The microneedle patches developed at Georgia Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Drug Delivery each contain an array of needles less than a millimeter long. Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology hide caption

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Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

A pump jack at work in 2016, near Firestone, Colo. The American Exploration & Production Council, which represents oil and gas exploration firms, is one of many industry groups supporting the HONEST Act, which was passed by the House and is now with the Senate. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

GOP Effort To Make Environmental Science 'Transparent' Worries Scientists

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Northern elephant seals recognize each other's voices based on rhythm and pitch. Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology hide caption

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Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology

Threat call of a northern elephant seal

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Researchers Examine When People Are More Susceptible To Fake News

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According to research from Harvard, between 10% and 40% of the kids who intend to go to college at the time of high school graduation don't actually show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem. S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

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