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With financial aid declining, many college students can't afford to eat, studies show, even though about 40 percent are also working. Nearly 1 in 4 college students are parents, which can add to their financial stress. franckreporter/Getty Images hide caption

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Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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Unless you replenish fluids, just an hour's hike in the heat or a 30-minute run might be enough to get mildly dehydrated, scientists say. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated

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Jazz legend Billie Holiday at a recording session in 1957. Holiday's pioneering vocal style played with tempo, phrasing and pitch to stir hearts. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains

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This ancient piece of bread, more than 14,000 years old, is changing what archaeologists thought they knew about the history of food and agriculture. Amaia Arranz-Otaegui hide caption

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Amaia Arranz-Otaegui

Markets Punish Behavior That Reflects A CEO's Lack Of Integrity

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Waste engineer Jenna Jambeck of the University of Georgia surveys plastic waste in a southeast Asian village, where it will be recycled to make raw material for more plastic products. Jambeck advises Asian governments on how to keep plastic trash out of waterways. Courtesy of Amy Brooks hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Brooks

We're Drowning In Plastic Trash. Jenna Jambeck Wants To Save Us

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Brick transfers heat to dough more slowly than steel, allowing both pizza crust and toppings to simultaneously reach perfection. Aldo Pavan/Getty Images hide caption

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Having more than one child is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's, research finds, as is starting menstruation earlier in life than average and menopause later. Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hormone Levels Likely Influence A Woman's Risk Of Alzheimer's, But How?

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Scientists are in the early stages of developing new tests that could predict accurately if a woman is at risk of delivering her baby early. Steve Debenport/Getty Images hide caption

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Girard Children's Community Garden in Washington, D.C. was created on a vacant lot and is now a thriving community space for neighborhood kids, many of whom are from low-income communities of color. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Replacing Vacant Lots With Green Spaces Can Ease Depression In Urban Communities

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