Research News New advances in science, medicine, health, and technology.Stem cell research, drug research, and new treatments for disease.
Avi Ofer for NPR

How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

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Mowing the lawn can be good exercise, and is fun for some people. But others who find themselves squeezed for time might find the luxury of paying someone else to do it to be of much more value than buying more stuff. Kristen Solecki for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Solecki for NPR

Need A Happiness Boost? Spend Your Money To Buy Time, Not More Stuff

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Researchers aren't sure why strong relationships in adolescence seem to pay dividends later in life, but one hypothesis is that those bonds act as a buffer against depression and insults. Maria Fabrizio for NPR hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

After surgeons removed a tumor from Dan Fabbio's brain, they gave him his saxophone — to see whether he'd retained his ability to play. A year after his surgery, Fabbio is back to work full time as a music teacher. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

This Music Teacher Played His Saxophone While In Brain Surgery

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Simply going up in pitch at the end of a sentence can transform a statement into a question. Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Really? Really. How Our Brains Figure Out What Words Mean Based On How They're Said

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Hospital emergency departments are tasked with saving the lives of people who overdose on opioids. Clinicians and researchers hope that more can be done during the hospital encounter to connect people with treatment. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images

Vanessa Wauchope begins abdominal exercises in Leah Keller's class in San Francisco, Calif. Keller teaches an exercise, called "drawing in," to help strengthen abdominal muscles that tend to spread apart a bit during pregnancy. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

This sequence of images shows the development of embryos formed after eggs were injected with both CRISPR, a gene-editing tool, and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause cardiomyopathy. OHSU hide caption

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OHSU

Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

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Single malt Scotch whisky, produced at the Auchentoshan distillery near Glasgow, Scotland, could benefit from a little water, a new paper suggests. Andy Buchanan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Buchanan /AFP/Getty Images
Matt Twombly for NPR

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

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Binge-drinking sounds like an all-night bender, but here's a reality check: Many social drinkers may "binge" without knowing it. Women who drink four or more drinks on an occasion are binge-drinking. Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works hide caption

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Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works

With Heavy Drinking On The Rise, How Much Is Too Much?

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Arthritis is a joint disease that can cause cartilage destruction and erosion of the bone, as well as tendon inflammation and rupture. Affected areas are highlighted in red in this enhanced X-ray. Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source

6,000-Year-Old Knee Joints Suggest Osteoarthritis Isn't Just Wear And Tear

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