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UK Biobank, based in Manchester, England, is the largest blood-based research project in the world. The research project will involve at least 500,000 people across the U.K., and follow their health for next 30 years or more, providing a resource for scientists battling diseases. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

UK Biobank Requires Earth's Geneticists To Cooperate, Not Compete

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The Australian federal government has downgraded its long-term outlook of the Great Barrier Reef to "very poor," and it says that climate change is the most significant threat. William West /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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William West /AFP/Getty Images

Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences hide caption

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Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'

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Among patients age 12 and older in a study of people with mild, persistent asthma, more than half did just as well, or better, on a placebo as they did on a steroid inhaler used twice per day to prevent symptoms. hsyncoban/Getty Images hide caption

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hsyncoban/Getty Images

Study Questions Mainstay Treatment For Mild Asthma

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Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm

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Naked mole rats are eusocial, which means they live all crowded together, in a colony underground. Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source

Astrocyte cells like these from the brain of a mouse may differ subtly from those in a human brain. David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People

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A 15-year-old in Cambridge, Mass., shows off her vaping device in 2018. Schools and health officials across the U.S. are struggling to curb what they say is an epidemic of underage vaping. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Though not the same as actually jumping into the waves, a virtual reality program like this one that let a headset-wearing patient "swim with dolphins" was enough of an immersive distraction to significantly reduce pain, a study found. Courtesy of Cedars Sinai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Courtesy of Cedars Sinai/Screenshot by NPR

Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away

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A Harvard research team's prototype of a portable exosuit is made of cloth components worn at the waist and thighs. A computer that's built into the shorts uses an algorithm that can sense when the user shifts between a walking gait and a running gait. Wyss Institute at Harvard University hide caption

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Wyss Institute at Harvard University

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail

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Health workers in protective suits tend to an Ebola victim kept in an isolation cube in Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Jerome Delay/AP

2 Experimental Ebola Drugs Saved Lives In Congo Outbreak

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A goldenrod midge maggot begins to form a loop. Reproduced/adapted with permission of Journal of Experimental Biology, Farley, G. M., Wise, M. J., Harrison, J. S., Sutton, G. P., Kuo, C. and Patek, S. N., 2019, Journal of Experimental Biology, volume 222, doi:10.1242/jeb.201129 hide caption

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Reproduced/adapted with permission of Journal of Experimental Biology, Farley, G. M., Wise, M. J., Harrison, J. S., Sutton, G. P., Kuo, C. and Patek, S. N., 2019, Journal of Experimental Biology, volume 222, doi:10.1242/jeb.201129

Scientists Find Out How Leaping Maggots Leap

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Honeybees are seen feeding on the honeydew of whiteflies in citrus trees. Traces of neonicotinoids, a family of pesticides, have shown up in honeydew, an important food source for other insects. Alejandro Tena hide caption

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Alejandro Tena

Robyn Adcock (left), a University of California, San Francisco pain relief specialist, gently guides Jessica Greenfield to acupressure points on her son's foot and leg that have helped relieve his chronic pain. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Pain Rescue Team Helps Seriously Ill Kids Cope In Terrible Times

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