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A surgical team at Sooam Biotech in Seoul, South Korea, injects cloned embryos into the uterus of an anesthetized dog. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Disgraced Scientist Clones Dogs, And Critics Question His Intent

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Ken (left) and Henry were created using DNA plucked from a skin cell of Melvin, the beloved pet of Paula and Phillip Dupont of Lafayette, La. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

Cloning Your Dog, For A Mere $100,000

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The large British study, begun in 1958, tracked the diet, habits and emotional and physical health of thousands of people from childhood through midlife. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Childhood Stress May Prime Pump For Chronic Disease Later

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In 1954, Dr. Frederick C. Robbins, then chief of pediatrics and contagious diseases at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, was one of three winners of that year's Nobel Prize in medicine. The scientists' work, which led to a vaccine against polio, was performed in human fetal cells. AP hide caption

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AP

Research On Fetal Tissue Draws Renewed Political, Scientific Scrutiny

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Hidden Brain: What's The Source Of Success In Sports?

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The Cost Of Interruptions: They Waste More Time Than You Think

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Thomas Kuhlenbeck/Ikon Images/Corbis

Wherever You Go, Your Personal Cloud Of Microbes Follows

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Sleepless Fruit Flies Could Hold The Secret To Curing Insomnia

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The federal food stamps program is working to make sure low-income Americans are getting enough calories, but those calories are less nutritious than what everyone else eats, research finds. The USDA is funding programs to try to bridge that gap, such as initiatives that allow food stamp recipients to use their benefits at farmers markets. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen Breed/AP

While wearing a toilet seat on his head, David Hu accepts the Physics Prize, for his research on the principle that mammals empty their bladders of urine in about 21 seconds, from Dudley Herschbach, right, the 1986 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, while being honored during a performance at the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Harvard Honors Scientific Researchers With Ig Nobels

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Rough night? Depending on specific tweaks to their genes, some fruit flies have trouble falling asleep, and others can't stay asleep. Getting too little shut-eye hurts their memory. David M. Phillips/Science Source hide caption

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David M. Phillips/Science Source

How Research On Sleepless Fruit Flies Could Help Human Insomniacs

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Gulping down coffee to stay awake at night delays the body's natural surge of the sleep hormone melatonin. Hayato D./Flickr hide caption

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Hayato D./Flickr

Caffeine At Night Resets Your Inner Clock

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