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The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the flu vaccine an "essential" part of prenatal care, for protection of the newborn as well as the woman. Infants typically don't get their own flu shot until age 6 months or later. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

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Food allergies are tricky to diagnose, and many kids can outgrow them, too. A test called an oral food challenge is the gold standard to rule out an allergy. It's performed under medical supervision. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

This Test Can Determine Whether You've Outgrown A Food Allergy

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Researchers have won a prize for discovering that a cow's genetics determine which microbes populate its gut. Some of those microbes produce the greenhouse gas methane that comes out of cow belches and farts and ends up in the atmosphere. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

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Charlie Litchfield/AP

A duck-billed dinosaur skeleton, which the researchers think ate crustaceans, on display in 2009 at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Examining Links Between Academic Performance And Food Stamps

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Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

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University Studied How Men With Shaved Heads Are Perceived

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While benzodiazepines and SSRI antidepressants are not risk-free, says Yale psychiatrist Kimberly Yonkers, "it should be reassuring that we're not seeing a huge magnitude of an effect here" on pregnancy. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Xanax Or Zoloft For Moms-To-Be: A New Study Assesses Safety

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Matthew Rockloff and Nancy Greer give their acceptance speech after winning the Ig Nobel Economics Prize during ceremonies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday. The pair won for their experiments to see how contact with a live crocodile affects a person's willingness to gamble. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Experiments that showed how to make the H5N1 bird flu virus more contagious raised concern about malicious misuse of laboratory research. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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