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An artist's reconstruction of Ledumahadi mafube, which means "a giant thunderclap at dawn," foraging during the early Jurassic in South Africa. Viktor Radermacher, University of the Witwatersrand hide caption

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Viktor Radermacher, University of the Witwatersrand

Bones Reveal The Brontosaurus Had An Older, Massive Cousin In South Africa

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A conservative think tank said that the Health and Human Services announcement doesn't go far enough and that Secretary Alex Azar "should redirect those funds to modern science and better alternatives." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The people-plaguing Asian tiger mosquito, or Aedes albopictus, typically lays its eggs in stagnant water. James Gathany/AP hide caption

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James Gathany/AP

Building A Better Mosquito Trap — One Scientist Thinks He's Done It

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This adult Anopheles gambiae mosquito — the kind that spreads malaria — was genetically modified as part of the study. Andrew Hammond hide caption

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Andrew Hammond

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria

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Of parents who tell pollsters their teens have trouble sleeping, 23 percent say the kids are waking up at night worried about their social lives. A third are worried about school. All-night access to electronic devices only aggravates the problem, sleep scientists say. 3photo/Getty Images hide caption

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3photo/Getty Images

Study: Since The 1970s, Drug Overdoses Have Grown Exponentially

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Immature human eggs (pink) were created by Japanese researchers using stem cells that were derived from blood cells. Courtesy of Saitou Lab hide caption

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Courtesy of Saitou Lab

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

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The fix was in for this rhesus macaque drinking juice on the Ganges River in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India. No gambling was required to get the reward. Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM hide caption

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Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM

In Lab Turned Casino, Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Risk-Taking Brain Area

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Friend or foe? A California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) gives observers the eye at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory hide caption

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Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy

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A Swiss study tracking the health of a group of children conceived via assisted reproductive technology found that a surprising number developed premature aging of their blood vessels. Now in their teens, 15 percent have hypertension. Steve Debenport/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Debenport/Getty Images

Christie's exhibition space in King Street, London, United Kingdom. Exhibition of impressionists artworks in June 2014. Lionel Derimais/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Derimais/Getty Images

Researchers Explore Gender Disparities In The Art World

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Nearly 62 percent of respondents had at least one ACE and a quarter reported three or more. The remaining respondents had at least two ACEs, including 16 percent with four or more such experiences. Elva Etienne/Getty Images hide caption

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Elva Etienne/Getty Images