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After finishing up some household chores, Brody Knapp gets a chance to play with his mother, Ashley, at their home in Kansas City, Mo. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Pediatricians Stand By Meds For ADHD, But Some Say Therapy Should Come First

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U.S. adults put on about a pound a year on average. But people who had a regular nut-snacking habit put on less weight and had a lower risk of becoming obese over time, a new study finds. R.Tsubin/Getty Images hide caption

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R.Tsubin/Getty Images

Just A Handful Of Nuts May Help Keep Us From Packing On The Pounds As We Age

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Triathletes who trained too much chose immediate gratification over long-term rewards, researchers found. Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images

Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains

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A selection of small feeding vessels dating back to the late Bronze Age and early Iron Age. Researchers now say vessels like these were used as prehistoric baby bottles. Katharina Rebay-Salisbury hide caption

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Katharina Rebay-Salisbury

An employee of the Boston biotech company Ginkgo Bioworks runs a gene sequencing machine through its paces. The company synthesizes thousands of genes a month, which are then inserted into cells that become mini factories of useful products. Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks hide caption

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Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder

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On the advice of a co-worker, Dehne joined a six-week program through which she learned how to safely walk to ease her pain. Now Dehne briskly walks for exercise and enjoyment multiple times a week. Her knees, she says, "don't hurt me anymore." Eamon Queeney for NPR hide caption

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Eamon Queeney for NPR

Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help

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(Left to right) Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org hide caption

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Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org

North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

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Scientists Will Deliberately Encase Their Ship In Arctic Sea Ice

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Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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Bridget Desmukes (center) and her husband, Jeffrey, love having a big, active family. "The kids are always climbing on things, flipping all the time — it's not dull," she says, laughing. Because Desmukes had developed preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, her OB-GYN recommended low-dose aspirin at her first prenatal appointment this past spring. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives

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These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

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Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

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The EPA says it aims to eliminate the testing of chemicals and pesticides in animals by 2035. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

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Joe Bay (center), coach of a New York City "Bootcamp for New Dads," instructs Adewale Oshodi (left) and George Pasco in how to cradle an infant for best soothing. Jason LeCras for NPR hide caption

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Jason LeCras for NPR