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Scientists exhumed 10 wooden braziers from eight tombs at the ancient Jirzankal Cemetery in what is now western China. Many of the braziers held stones that were apparently heated and used to burn cannabis plants. Xinhua Wu/Science Advances hide caption

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Xinhua Wu/Science Advances

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Improve Black Men's Life Expectancy

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Processed meats, including hot dogs and bacon, cook in a frying pan. A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who cut back. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Michigan State University doctoral student Mike Morrison has a redesign for scientific posters to spell out their main point in big, easy-to-read letters. Courtesy of Mike Morrison hide caption

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Courtesy of Mike Morrison

To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over

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An engraving shows Galla Placidia (390-450), daughter of Roman Emperor Theodosius I, in captivity. New research shows that in some cases, we are drinking almost the exact same wine that Roman emperors did — our pinot noir and syrah grapes are genetic "siblings" of the ancient Roman varieties. Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images

Jeannine sorts through a binder of writing assignments from her therapy. In keeping a journal about her past experiences with pain, she noticed that the pain symptoms began when she was around 8 — a time of escalating family trauma at home. Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Pons for NPR

Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?

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Accumulated Mutations Create A Cellular Mosaic In Our Bodies

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The deep ocean is filled with sea creatures like giant larvaceans. They're actually the size of tadpoles, but they're surrounded by a yard-wide bubble of mucus that collects food — and plastic. Courtesy of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Microplastics Have Invaded The Deep Ocean — And The Food Chain

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A border collie jumps to catch a flying disc during a competition. New research suggests that dog stress mirrors owner stress, especially in dogs and humans who compete together. Bela Szandelszky/AP hide caption

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Bela Szandelszky/AP

You May Be Stressing Out Your Dog

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The Department of Health and Human Services says its decision to place new restrictions on the use of human fetal tissue in medical research follows a review that began last September of HHS research involving such tissue. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Some scientists oppose a prohibition on trying to use genetically modified embryos to create babies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies

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The genetic variation Chinese scientist He Jiankui was trying to re-create when he edited twin girls' DNA may be more harmful than helpful to health overall, a new study says. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

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A California two-spot octopus extends a sucker-lined arm from its den. In 2015, this was the first octopus species to have its full genetic sequence published. Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

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Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a compound that can be extracted from marijuana or from hemp. It doesn't get people high because it doesn't contain THC, the psychoactive component of the cannabis plant. Getty Images hide caption

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