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An early prototype of the silicon-chip-sized particle accelerator that physicists at Stanford are working on. Eventually, miniature accelerators might have a role in radiating tumors, the scientists say. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hide caption

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Physicists Go Small: Let's Put A Particle Accelerator On A Chip

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UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA
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More Screen Time For Teens Linked To ADHD Symptoms

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Surfing For Science: A New Way To Gather Data For Ocean And Coastal Research

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Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too

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Time outdoors leaves you vulnerable to tick bites and the diseases they can transmit. New research seeks to a better picture of the geographic spread of ticks that carry dangerous pathogens. Ascent/PKS Media Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

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Ascent/PKS Media Inc. via Getty Images
Hayley Bartels/NPR

Want A Creative Spark? Get To Know Someone From Another Culture

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When ticks come into contact with clothing sprayed with permethrin, research shows, they quickly become incapacitated and are unable to bite. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

To Repel Ticks, Try Spraying Your Clothes With A Pesticide That Mimics Mums

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Any amount of opioid use was associated with a higher risk of arrest, parole or probation according to a new study. Marie Hickman/Getty Images hide caption

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Marie Hickman/Getty Images

Keeper Zachariah Mutai attends in March to Fatu, one of only two female northern white rhinos left in the world, in the pen where she is kept for observation, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia county in Kenya. Scientists have successfully grown hybrid white rhino embryos in the lab, stoking hopes that a purebred northern white rhino could be implanted in a surrogate. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

Scientists Hope Lab-Grown Embryos Can Save Rhino Species From Extinction

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Some firefighters, paramedics and police officers say the tragedies they respond to haunt them, leading to depression, job burnout, substance abuse, and more. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Researchers at the University of California, Davis are testing whether adding seaweed to cows' feed reduces methane emissions. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

Surf And Turf: To Reduce Gas Emissions From Cows, Scientists Look To The Ocean

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