Research News New advances in science, medicine, health, and technology.Stem cell research, drug research, and new treatments for disease.

Research News

On the advice of a co-worker, Dehne joined a six-week program through which she learned how to safely walk to ease her pain. Now Dehne briskly walks for exercise and enjoyment multiple times a week. Her knees, she says, "don't hurt me anymore." Eamon Queeney for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eamon Queeney for NPR

Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/754869132/763323847" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

(Left to right) Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org hide caption

toggle caption
Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org

North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/762090471/762485856" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists Will Deliberately Encase Their Ship In Arctic Sea Ice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/762212377/762212378" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/744117217/761831647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bridget Desmukes (center) and her husband, Jeffrey, love having a big, active family. "The kids are always climbing on things, flipping all the time — it's not dull," she says, laughing. Because Desmukes had developed preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, her OB-GYN recommended low-dose aspirin at her first prenatal appointment this past spring. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753433968/761126925" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

toggle caption
Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/757072996/759899470" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The EPA says it aims to eliminate the testing of chemicals and pesticides in animals by 2035. filo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
filo/Getty Images

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/759435118/759554295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Joe Bay (center), coach of a New York City "Bootcamp for New Dads," instructs Adewale Oshodi (left) and George Pasco in how to cradle an infant for best soothing. Jason LeCras for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason LeCras for NPR

A gas flare from the Shell Chemical LP petroleum refinery illuminates the sky on Aug. 21 in Norco, La. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Opinion: Earth Has Survived Extinctions Before, It's Humans Who Are Fragile

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758448991/758578075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

UK Biobank has granted 10,000 qualified scientists access to its large database of genetic sequences and other medical data, but other organizations with databases have been far more restrictive in giving access. KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

toggle caption
KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

How Should Scientists' Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/755402750/758199447" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The New York State Department of Health said Thursday that it is looking at vitamin E acetate as a potential cause of severe pulmonary illness cases in the state that have been associated with vaping. Daniel Becerril/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Becerril/Reuters

The sounds of pleasant, relaxed bird chatter made eastern grey squirrels resume foraging more quickly after hearing the sounds of a predator, researchers found. Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images

The Other Twitterverse: Squirrels Eavesdrop On Birds, Researchers Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/757530544/757626273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bags of heroin, some laced with fentanyl, picked up in a 2016 New York City drug bust. "Basically, [fentanyl] is so cheap to produce and it's so powerful, that drug dealers began realizing it was a way to increase their profits," Fentanyl, Inc. author Ben Westhoff says. But miscalculations of the amount used can be deadly. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Fentanyl As A Dark Web Profit Center, From Chinese Labs To U.S. Streets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/757089868/757585981" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers in the U.K. say a teen has suffered vision loss after years of eating a highly limited diet consisting of snacking on Pringles potato chips, as well as French fries, white bread and some processed pork products. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Blind From A Bad Diet? Teen Who Ate Mostly Potato Chips And Fries Lost His Sight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/757051172/757220158" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript