Science The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.

Science

In this photo provided by the Department of Fire and Emergency Services, its members search for a radioactive capsule believed to have fallen off a truck being transported on a freight route on the outskirts of Perth, Australia, on Saturday. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

A "mysterious" flying spiral spotted by the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, early on Jan. 18, could be related to a SpaceX satellite launch earlier in the day, scientists speculated. NAOJ & Asahi Shimbun via Storyful/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NAOJ & Asahi Shimbun via Storyful/Screenshot by NPR

A field researcher holds a male bat that was trapped in an overhead net as part of an effort to find out how the animals pass Nipah virus to humans. The animal will be tested for the virus, examined and ultimately released. Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR

Trying to crack the Nipah code: How does this deadly virus spill from bats to humans?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1148681236/1152751704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Dr. Yejin Choi University of Washington Professor and MacArthur Fellow, works to improve AI's understanding of common sense. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

toggle caption
John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Wegovy has been called "a major breakthrough" given how well it works to reduce body weight. But the injection drug is extremely expensive and when people can't afford to stay on it, they experience rebound weight gain that's hard to stop. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Wegovy works. But here's what happens if you can't afford to keep taking the drug

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152039799/1152448849" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Recently, Richard Trumka, the commissioner of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), suggested regulating gas stoves. A growing body of research points to health and climate risks associated with the use of gas stoves. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

On Jan. 23, 2020, as the coronavirus spread in China, residents of Wuhan, where it was first identified, donned masks to go shopping. The U.S. didn't officially endorse masks as a preventive measure for the public for a number of weeks. Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stringer/Getty Images

Prairie voles mate for life and are frequently used to study human behavior. Todd H. Ahern/Emory University hide caption

toggle caption
Todd H. Ahern/Emory University

Can you bond without the 'love hormone'? These cuddly rodents show it's possible

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152009605/1152140625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Seeds are seen as students at Eucalyptus Elementary School in in Hawthorne, Calif., learn to plant a vegetable garden on March 13, 2019. The U.S. supply of native seeds is currently too low to respond to climate change-related events, a new report finds. David McNew/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/AFP via Getty Images

This image shows purified particles of mpox virus, formerly called monkeypox. Viruses like these can be genetically altered in the lab in ways that might make them more dangerous. NIAID hide caption

toggle caption
NIAID

When is it OK to make germs worse in a lab? It's a more relevant question than ever

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1151867224/1151957966" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Of the many species the scientists photographed aboard the RV Investigator, the deep-sea batfish made one of the biggest splashes across social media. Benjamin Healley / Museums Victoria hide caption

toggle caption
Benjamin Healley / Museums Victoria

Scientists discover fantastical creatures deep in the Indian Ocean

Yi-Kai Tea, a biodiversity research fellow at the Australian Museum in Sydney, has amassed a social media following as @KaiTheFishGuy for his sassy writing and gorgeous photos of fish and other wildlife.

Scientists discover fantastical creatures deep in the Indian Ocean

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1151062783/1151761846" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Asteroid 2023 BU will streak about 2,200 miles above the Earth's surface on Thursday night. Its path is seen here in an image from NASA's Scout impact hazard assessment system. The moon's path is in gray. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-Caltech
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

6 doctors swallowed Lego heads for science. Here's what came out

As an emergency physician at Western Health, in Melbourne, Australia, Dr. Andy Tagg says he meets a lot of anxious parents whose children have swallowed Lego pieces. Much like Andy so many years ago, the vast majority of kids simply pass the object through their stool within a day or so. But Andy and five other pediatricians wondered, is there a way to give parents extra reassurance ... through science?

6 doctors swallowed Lego heads for science. Here's what came out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1150888553/1151561328" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ICARDA lab employee Bilal Inaty cuts a lentil plant in order to test it for various diseases at the ICARDA research station in the village of Terbol in Lebanon's Bekaa valley, on Dec. 21, 2022. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dalia Khamissy for NPR

How ancient seeds from the Fertile Crescent could help save us from climate change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1149738126/1151143617" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">