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Cars line up Friday at a coronavirus testing site at the University of Texas at El Paso. The area has seen a surge in cases in recent weeks, and a two-week curfew is now in effect in El Paso County. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb the spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don't have sufficient masks and other personal protective equipment. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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SDI Productions/Getty Images

They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That May Spread The Virus

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Researchers have detected water molecules in Clavius crater, in the moon's southern hemisphere. The large crater is visible from Earth. NASA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NASA/Screenshot by NPR

In Fort Collins, Colorado State University has been running a robust wastewater testing program since the start of the fall semester. Researchers regularly collect samples from 17 sites across campus, including the Westfall Hall dormitory. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Colleges Turn To Wastewater Testing In An Effort To Flush Out The Coronavirus

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A "murder" scene could seem creepy, but what is going on inside these crows' minds may be most unsettling. Dragan Todorovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Dragan Todorovic/Getty Images

An artist's rendering shows NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft descending toward the asteroid Bennu to collect a sample of the asteroid's surface. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

Ryan and Jennifer Montano search through the remains of their Vacaville, Calif., home, destroyed in the LNU Lightning Complex Fire in August. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

How Much Do You Really Know About Your Flood Or Wildfire Risk?

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Fall foliage along Riverfront Drive in Reading, PA. MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Micro Wave: Why Do Leaves Change Color During Fall?

Botanist and founder of #BlackBotanistsWeek Tanisha Williams explains why some leaves change color during fall and what shorter days and colder temperatures have to do with it.

Micro Wave: Why Do Leaves Change Color During Fall?

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Rural communities across the country, places largely spared during the early days of the pandemic, are now seeing spikes in infections and hospitalizations. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

COVID-19 Surges In Rural Communities, Overwhelming Some Local Hospitals

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The remnants of Hurricane Sandy churn up Lake Michigan in Chicago in 2012. Flood risk in the city is increasing as climate change drives more extreme rain, and renters face greater financial peril than homeowners. More than half of Chicagoans are renters, according to 2019 census data. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Most Tenants Get No Information About Flooding. It Can Cost Them Dearly

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Passengers wear face masks at Tocumen International Airport in Panama City on Oct. 12. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

From Air Travel to Hospital Treatment, We're Still Learning About The Virus

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A California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection airplane drops fire retardant along a burning hill during the Glass Fire in Calistoga, Calif., in September. California is one of two states to require wildfire risk be disclosed to new homebuyers. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Homes Are At Risk Of Wildfires, But It's Rarely Disclosed

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Recruiting patients for medical studies has been challenging during the pandemic, especially older people who are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously Despite The Pandemic

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Lachlan (left) and Lillian Barilleau play in the backyard of their home in Central, La. They were displaced from the house for months after a flood in 2016. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Living In Harm's Way: Why Most Flood Risk Is Not Disclosed

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In his book How To, Randall Munroe explores whether you could open enough water bottles to fill a swimming pool — using nuclear weapons. Riverhead Books hide caption

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Riverhead Books

Randall Munroe's Absurd Scientific Advice For Real-World Problems

Randall Munroe, the cartoonist behind the popular Internet comic xkcd, finds complicated solutions to simple, real-world problems. In the process, he reveals a lot about science and why the real world is sometimes even weirder than we expect. His latest book is called How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems. (Encore episode.)

Randall Munroe's Absurd Scientific Advice For Real-World Problems

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Mental health advocates say 988, a simple three-digit number, will be easier for people to remember in the midst of a mental health emergency. T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF

New Law Creates 988 Hotline For Mental Health Emergencies

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This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 images collected on Dec. 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

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Conceptual artwork of quantum entanglement, one of the consequences of quantum theory. Two particles will appear to be linked across space and time, with changes to one of the particles (such as an observation or measurement) affecting the other one. Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

The Washington State Department of Agriculture team tracked the Asian giant hornet for about an hour earlier this month, before losing her signal in a forest. Courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture hide caption

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Courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture

Foiled Again: Murder Hornet Eludes Washington State Scientists

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