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A mobile COVID-19 vaccination center in Bolton, U.K., sends a message earlier this month. Variants that were first found in various places are wreaking havoc on the global fight to control this coronavirus. Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images

Delta Variant Of The Coronavirus Could Dominate In U.S. Within Weeks

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U.S. President Joe Biden (left) speaks as Vice President Kamala Harris (right) listens during an event in the South Court Auditorium of the White House. President Biden spoke on the COVID-19 response and the vaccination program announcing new incentives including free beer, free childcare and free sports tickets to push Americans to get vaccinated before July 4th. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

Health Correspondent Allison Aubrey updates us on the Biden Administration's goal to have 70 percent of U.S. adults vaccinated by the July 4. Plus, as vaccine makers plan for the possibility that COVID-19 vaccine boosters will be needed, they're pushing ahead with research into new-generation flu shots and mRNA cancer vaccines.

COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

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Manatees are large marine mammals native to Florida that spend their time grazing on sea grass in shallow coastal areas. Since January, recorded manatee deaths have been nearly triple that of the same period for each of the past five years. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images

As Seagrass Habitats Decline, Florida Manatees Are Dying Of Starvation

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A few years ago Cleveland linked climate policy and social equity. Now the Ohio city is hoping to use federal funding to help achieve its climate action goals. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The White House Wants To Fight Climate Change And Help People. Cleveland Led The Way

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Sea cucumbers have one of the more interesting — and multifunctional — anuses in the animal kingdom. Comstock Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Comstock Images/Getty Images

Behold! The Anus: An Evolutionary Marvel

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Photographer Taylor Lockwood found the rare mushroom Hypocreopsis rhododendri growing in the United States, a discovery that delighted scientists and mushroom devotees. Taylor F. Lockwoood hide caption

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Taylor F. Lockwoood

Enthusiastic Amateurs Advance Science As They Hunt For Exotic Mushrooms

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The COVID-19 pandemic has been particularly difficult for unpaid caregivers, with many reporting symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. Portra Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images via Getty Images

Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic

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Washington State Department of Agriculture entomologist Chris Looney displays a dead Asian giant hornet, a sample sent from Japan and brought in for research last year in Blaine, Wash. Elaine Thompson /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elaine Thompson /AFP via Getty Images

A teen gets a dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine last month at Holtz Children's Hospital in Miami. Nearly 7 million U.S. teens and preteens (ages 12 through 17) have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine so far, the CDC says. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Security personnel stand guard outside the Wuhan Institute of Virology during the Feb. 3 visit of the World Health Organization team investigating the origins of the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that triggered a pandemic. Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images

Unproven Lab Leak Theory Brings Pressure On China To Share Info. But It May Backfire

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British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee is selling the source code for the World Wide Web as an NFT. Here, Berners-Lee delivers a speech during an event at the CERN in Meyrin near Geneva, Switzerland. Fabrice Coffrini/AP hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AP

Kayla Northam's weight topped 300 pounds as a teenager. She'd started to develop diabetes, and liver and joint problems before seeking bariatric surgery about a decade ago at age 18. Kayla Northam hide caption

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Kayla Northam

Bariatric Surgery Works, But Isn't Offered To Most Teens Who Have Severe Obesity

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Deja Perkins is an urban ecologist, bird watcher, and an organizer of Black Birders Week. Deja Perkins hide caption

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Deja Perkins

#BlackBirdersWeek 2021: Celebrating The Joy Of Birds

#BlackBirdersWeek emerged last year from a groundswell of support for Christian Cooper, a Black man and avid birder, who was harassed by a white woman while birding in Central Park. This year is all about celebrating Black joy. Co-organizer Deja Perkins talks about how the week went and why it's important to observe nature wherever you live.

#BlackBirdersWeek 2021: Celebrating The Joy Of Birds

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Joy Ho for NPR

5 Ways To Stop Summer Colds From Making The Rounds In Your Family

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There are over 7,000 known languages spoken by people around the world. Olga Klimentyeva / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Olga Klimentyeva / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

'I'm Willing To Fight For It': Learning A Second Language As An Adult

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The Disordered Cosmos

Maddie talks with physicist Chanda Prescod-Weinstein about her new book, The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred. In the episode, we talk quarks (one of the building blocks of the universe), intersectionality and access to the night sky as a fundamental right.

The Disordered Cosmos

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Janelia's cafeteria, which was noisy and crowded in pre-pandemic times, now operates a contactless takeout system. Sarah Silbiger for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger for NPR

It's Personal: Zoom'd Out Workplace Ready For Face-To-Face Conversations To Return

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Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Anti-Vaccine Activists Use A Federal Database To Spread Fear About COVID Vaccines

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A monarch butterfly flies to Joe Pye weed, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019, in Freeport, Maine. Rapid development and climate change are escalating the rates of species loss, according to the United Nations. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Migrating Monarchs

It is one of the Earth's great migrations: each year, millions of monarch butterflies fly some 3,000 miles, from their summer breeding grounds as far north as Canada to their overwintering sites in the central Mexico. It's one of the best-studied migrations and in recent years, ecologists like Sonia Altizer have been able to better answer how and why these intrepid butterflies make the journey. Short Wave brings this episode from the TED Radio Hour's episode with Sonia Altizer, with the University of Georgia.

Migrating Monarchs

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