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This image provided by Vinal Applebee shows the home of Lisa Gorman in the foreground, the poisoned oak trees behind her home, and the home of the alleged perpetrators behind the dead trees, in Camden, Maine. Courtesy Vinal Applebee/AP hide caption

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Courtesy Vinal Applebee/AP

A woman whose remains were discovered roughly 40 years ago by children in Southern California has been identified as Maritza Glean Grimmett. The remains, which were discovered in 1983 in what is now Lake Forest, Calif., were positively identified by investigators in the Orange County, Calif., Sheriff’s Department. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children hide caption

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National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Pixar's new movie Inside Out 2 revisits the internal life of Riley, as she hits puberty and copes with a growing range of emotions. Pixar hide caption

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Pixar

Palestinians are walking along Salah al-Din Road in Deir Al-Balah, in the central Gaza Strip, on Feb. 11, 2024, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinian militant group Hamas. Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How is Israel Using Facial Recognition in Gaza?

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People rested at the Oregon Convention Center cooling station in Portland, Oregon during a record-breaking heat wave in 2021. FEMA has never responded to an extreme heat emergency, but some hope that will change. (Photo by Kathryn Elsesser / AFP via Getty Images) Kathryn Elsesser/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kathryn Elsesser/AFP via Getty Images

FEMA heat disaster petition

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National security professionals are warning that climate change is a growing threat to global elections. Tobias Schwarz/Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/Getty Images

National security expert warns that extreme weather threatens democracy

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Pluto on July 14, 2015. The image combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera. NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI hide caption

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NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

The 'i'iwi is one of Hawaii's honeycreepers, forest birds that are found nowhere else. There were once more than 50 species. Now, only 17 remain. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Some people get obsessed with romance and fantasy novels. What's the science behind this kind of guilty pleasure? proxyminder/Getty Images/E+ hide caption

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proxyminder/Getty Images/E+

pleasure

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Malcolm Reid at home in Decatur, Georgia, with his dog, Sampson. Reid, who recently marked his 66th birthday and the anniversary of his HIV diagnosis, is part of a growing group of people 50 and older living with the virus. Sam Whitehead/KFF Health News hide caption

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Sam Whitehead/KFF Health News

People with HIV are aging, and the challenges are piling up

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Christina Chung/LAist

Inheriting: Leah & Japanese American Incarceration

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A satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows Hurricane Idalia, center, over Florida and crossing into Georgia, and Hurricane Franklin, right, as it moves along off the East coast of the U.S., on Aug. 30, 2023. AP/NOAA hide caption

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AP/NOAA

Bill Gates poses for a portrait at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., June 13, 2024. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

BILL GATES GOES NUCLEAR

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Joro spider sits in the middle of a spider web. GummyBone/Getty Images hide caption

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GummyBone/Getty Images

This illustration shows how the thin film of sensors could be applied to the brain before surgery. Courtesy of the Integrated Electronics and Biointerfaces Laboratory hide caption

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Courtesy of the Integrated Electronics and Biointerfaces Laboratory

Brain sensor

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A new study looks at the roles that African and European genetic ancestries can play in Black Americans' risk for some brain disorders. TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

African ancestry genes may be linked to Black Americans' risk for some brain disorders

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Suppressing mosquitoes could give birds like the kiwikiu a chance to survive. “There is no place safe for them, so we have to make that place safe again,” says Chris Warren of Haleakalā National Park. “It’s the only option.”
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Robby Kohley/DLNR/MFBRP

Maui Birds vs. Mosquitos

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