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How Hackers Could Fool Artificial Intelligence

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Niticia Mpanga, a registered respiratory therapist, checks on an ICU patient at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. The mortality rates from COVID-19 in ICUs have been decreasing worldwide, doctors say, at least partly because of recent advances in treatment. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

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Satellite images of storms forming in the Atlantic Ocean. Tropical Storm Wilfred is the last named storm of the 2020 season using the English alphabet. Courtesy of NOAA hide caption

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Courtesy of NOAA

A recent study found that when a Black newborn was cared for by a Black physician, they were less likely to experience death in the hospital setting. Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kaz Fantone/NPR

About 1 In 5 Households In U.S. Cities Miss Needed Medical Care During Pandemic

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A researcher holds a tube containing the coronavirus. Lerexis/Getty Images hide caption

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Lerexis/Getty Images

'Scientific American' Breaks 175 Years Of Tradition, Endorses A Presidential Nominee

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Scientists used light to control the firing of specific cells to artificially create a rhythm in the brain that acted like the drug ketamine enjoynz/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

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People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

A child washes her hands at a day care center in Connecticut last month. A detailed look at COVID-19 deaths in U.S. kids and young adults by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the great majority are children of color. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Images from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory highlight the appearance of the sun at solar minimum (left, December 2019) versus solar maximum (right, April 2014). NASA hide caption

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NASA

More than 140 billion liters of fresh water are estimated to be flushed down the toilet every day. Paolo Cordoni / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Paolo Cordoni / EyeEm/Getty Images

Social psychologist Keith Payne says we have a bias toward comparing ourselves to people who have more than us, rather than those who have less Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The images used to create this view of Venus were acquired by the Mariner 10 craft on Feb. 7 and 8, 1974. Decades after the Mariner 2 flew by the planet in 1962, much about the planet remains unknown. NASA hide caption

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NASA

A Possible Sign Of Life Right Next Door To Earth, On Venus

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Nearly two decades after the 2002 Hayman fire in Colorado, this high-severity burn area near Cheesman Lake is still treeless. Michael Elizabeth Sakas/CPR News hide caption

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Michael Elizabeth Sakas/CPR News

The appointment of a climate change denier to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration comes as Americans face profound threats stoked by climate change, from the vast, deadly wildfires in the West to an unusually active hurricane season in the South and East. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Getty Images