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A 1930 tidal chart from the village of Bowling on the Firth of Clyde Andrew Matthews hide caption

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Andrew Matthews

Using fluorescent antibody-based stains and advanced microscopy, researchers are able to visualize cells of different species origins in an early stage chimeric embryo. The red color indicates the cells of human origin. Weizhi Ji/Kunming University of Science and Technology hide caption

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Weizhi Ji/Kunming University of Science and Technology

Scientists Create Early Embryos That Are Part Human, Part Monkey

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Cars sit on the edge of a sinkhole in the Charles Village neighborhood of Baltimore, Wednesday, April 30, 2014, as heavy rain moves through the region. Roads closed due to flooding, downed trees and electrical lines elsewhere in the Mid-Atlantic. AP hide caption

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AP

Why Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

(Encore episode.) Earlier this year, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case brought by the city of Baltimore against more than a dozen major oil and gas companies including BP, ExxonMobil and Shell. In the lawsuit, BP P.L.C. v. Mayor and City Council of Baltimore, the city government argued that the fossil fuel giants must help pay for the costs of climate change because they knew that their products cause potentially catastrophic global warming. NPR climate reporter Rebecca Hersher has been following the case.

Why Baltimore Is Suing Big Oil Over Climate Change

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Dr. Anike Baptiste receives a dose of J&J from nurse Mokgadi Malebye at a Pretoria hospital last February. South Africa is one of the countries that announced a pause on the J&J vaccine while more research is done into potential blood clots that occurred in younger women after getting the vaccine. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

Earth's atmosphere photographed from the International Space Station. Greenhouse gases have accumulated rapidly and are trapping extra heat in the atmosphere. It will take decades for the gases to break down naturally or be reabsorbed on Earth's surface. Expedition 28 Crew/International Space Station/NASA hide caption

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Expedition 28 Crew/International Space Station/NASA

Carbon Emissions Could Plummet. The Atmosphere Will Lag Behind

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Jeff Zients, the White House COVID-19 response coordinator, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, brief reporters in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on Tuesday after two government agencies recommended a pause in the distribution of Johnson & Johnson's single-dose COVID-19 vaccine. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The J & J Pause, Explained — And What It Means For The U.S. Vaccination Effort

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Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., speaks during an event in 2018. Apple is one of 310 companies calling on the Biden administration to slash carbon emissions. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Men take a holy dip in the Ganges River on the occasion of first royal bath of Shivratri festival during Maha Kumbh Festival in Haridwar, India. Ritesh Shukla/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Ritesh Shukla/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Millions Flock To Hindu Festival Amid Coronavirus Spike

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A mass vaccination site at the Lumen Field Event Center in Seattle had plenty of takers for the COVID-19 vaccine when it opened in mid-March. Though some relatively rare cases of coronavirus infection have been documented despite vaccination, "I don't see anything that changes our concept of the vaccine and its efficacy," says Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

CDC Studies 'Breakthrough' COVID Cases Among People Already Vaccinated

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A portion of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The Flinders Reef area of the Great Barrier Reef is one of 11 sites around the world where scientists are looking for decisive geological evidence of a new epoch called the Anthropocene. Grant Faint/Getty Images hide caption

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Grant Faint/Getty Images

Debating When The 'Age Of Humans' Began

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Dr. Hassan Bencheqroun, an interventional pulmonary and critical care physician, has seen firsthand the impact of COVID-19 on Arab communities in the San Diego area. Hassan Bencheqroun hide caption

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Hassan Bencheqroun

An artist's impression of the Cretaceous Period meat-eating dinosaur Llukalkan aliocranianus that lived about 80 million years ago in the Patagonia region of Argentina is seen in this handout photo. Jorge Blanco/Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology via Reuters hide caption

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Jorge Blanco/Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology via Reuters

Newly Discovered Dinosaur Was Top Carnivorous Predator In Argentina

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A scientist works on COVID-19 samples to find variations of the virus at the Croix-Rousse Hospital laboratory in Lyon, France, in January. Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images

Can Vaccines Stop Variants? Here's What We Know So Far

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A satellite image from September 2017 shows Hurricane Irma, left, and Hurricane Jose, right, in the Atlantic Ocean. NOAA says the average annual number of tropical storms in the Atlantic has slightly increased. NOAA/GOES-16/AP hide caption

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NOAA/GOES-16/AP