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Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The U.S. Department of Agriculture this week approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people. Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University hide caption

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Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat

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A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone. While most of the structures point in one direction, the red arrow shows that some point in the other direction. Courtesy of Abigail Allwood hide caption

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Courtesy of Abigail Allwood

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' In 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks

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Black men are twice as likely as whites to die from prostate cancer, one of the deadliest cancers that affect males. Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

The authors of a new study on veterinarians and mental health say vet school should include more training on how to cope with the moral distress vets face when asked by pet owners to do things that are against their medical judgment. Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images

The Great Synagogue in Vilnius, Lithuania's capital, was built in the 17th century. Vilnius served as a center of Jewish life in Eastern Europe before World War II. Collection of Zusya Efron, Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University of Jerusalem hide caption

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Collection of Zusya Efron, Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Excavation Of Lithuania's Great Synagogue Highlights A 'Painful Page' From History

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"We have only begun to scratch the surface of the complex problems inherent in figuring out ... the brain's inner workings," said Paul Allen in 2012. Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images

The cost of a pint of beer could rise sharply in the U.S. and other countries because of increased risks from heat and drought, according to a new study that looks at climate change's possible effects on barley crops. Peter Nicholls/Reuters hide caption

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Peter Nicholls/Reuters

A house being rebuilt in Sonoma County where the Tubbs fire burned last year. The Tubbs fire was the most destructive fire in California history, destroying more than 5,000 structures. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Getting Back What You Lost — Rebuilding In A Wildfire Zone

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Wyoming attorney Karen Budd-Falen, recently named as Deputy Solicitor for Parks and Wildlife at the Department of the Interior, sits in her law office in Cheyenne, Wyo. Mead Gruver/AP hide caption

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Mead Gruver/AP

According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

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Jeff Van Horn, a land surveyor for the oil and gas industry, worries that Colorado's Proposition 112 would hurt industry growth. It seeks to dramatically increase the distance between wells and homes to 2,500 feet. Grace Hood/CPR hide caption

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Grace Hood/CPR

Colorado's Anti-Fracking Measure Would Keep Wells Farther Away From Homes And Schools

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