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Corals fertilize billions of offspring by casting sperm and eggs into the Pacific Ocean off the Queensland state coastal city of Cairns, Australia, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021. Gabriel Guzman/AP hide caption

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Gabriel Guzman/AP
Subin Yang for NPR

How To Choose A Health Insurance Plan

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A recent survey says about half of Americans are planning to attend gatherings of 10 or more people over the holidays. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Celebrate The Holidays Safely This Pandemic

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An illustration of the DART spacecraft approaching two asteroids; it will crash into the smaller one to try to change how this space rock orbits its larger companion. NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

In a first test of its planetary defense efforts, NASA's going to shove an asteroid

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Young people line up to receive shots of the Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, one of several Asian nations whose vaccination rates are now among the world's best. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Heng Sinith/AP

This illustration shows NASA's DART spacecraft and the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) LICIACube prior to impact at the Didymos binary system. NASA/Johns Hopkins, APL/Steve Gribben hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins, APL/Steve Gribben

A Mission To Redirect An Asteroid

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Scene from Avengers: Infinity War where Thanos snaps while wearing the infinity gauntlet. Marvel Studios' Avengers: Infinity War hide caption

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Marvel Studios' Avengers: Infinity War

Science shows a massive Marvel plot hole: Thanos couldn't have snapped with a glove

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Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Two Sides Of Guyana: A Green Champion And An Oil Producer

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Honey bees store the nutritious sweet treat in honeycomb. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Bee Superfood: Exploring Honey's Chemical Complexities

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While a thermometer will tell you if oil is hot enough for frying, scientists say the sound a wet chopstick makes when dipped into the oil will, too. Jason Kempin/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images

How do you know if your oil is hot enough to deep fry? Use your ears

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Davemaoite, the newly discovered mineral named after a prominent geophysicist, originated from the Earth's lower mantle. Aaron Celestian/Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County hide caption

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Aaron Celestian/Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

New mineral 'davemaoite' made an unlikely journey from the depths of the Earth

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Kenji López-Alt says spatchcocking the turkey is the best way to overcome the common problem of light meat overcooking by the time dark meat is ready. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im