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In this May 24, 2021 file photo, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the WHO, speaks at WHO headquarters, in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is asking China to be more transparent as scientists search for the origins of the coronavirus. Laurent Gillieron/AP hide caption

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Laurent Gillieron/AP

A combination of dependency on tips and requirements to appear positive on the job — "service with a smile" — contributes to a culture of sexual harassment in the service industry, a new study says. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

An Eastern Gray Squirrel eats some seeds and nuts from a bird feeder. Travis Lindquist/Getty Images hide caption

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Travis Lindquist/Getty Images

Who Runs The World? Squirrels!

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A thick haze hangs over Manhattan on Tuesday. Wildfires in the West, including the Bootleg Fire in Oregon, are creating hazy skies and poor air quality as far away as the East Coast. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

With new infections rising around the country due to the delta variant, reports of breakthrough cases among the fully vaccinated can be worrisome. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Will Delta Surge Sway Unvaccinated? Plus: The Truth About 'Breakthrough' Infections

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A man refuels his car in Paris in 2020. Men spend their money on greenhouse gas-emitting goods and services at a much higher rate than women, researchers found. Franck Fife/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Franck Fife/AFP via Getty Images

A sign at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet, Mass., warns of sharks in 2019. Beachgoers on the other side of the world will be happy to learn they will not be attacked by sharks ... just bitten. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Mountaineers climb the Hillary Step during their ascend of the South face to summit Mount Everest. Lakpa Sherpa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lakpa Sherpa/AFP via Getty Images

How Tall Is Mount Everest? Hint: It Changes

We talk to NPR's India correspondent Lauren Frayer about the ridiculously complicated science involved in measuring Mount Everest, the world's highest peak. And why its height is ever-changing. (Encore episode)

How Tall Is Mount Everest? Hint: It Changes

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A fence alongside Greenwood Cemetery, in Brooklyn, N.Y., is covered with memorial art for people who died of COVID-19. Pandemic deaths contributed to the biggest drop in life expectancy in decades. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket launches on Tuesday morning, carrying passengers Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and space tourism company Blue Origin; his brother, Mark Bezos; 82-year-old female aviation pioneer Wally Funk; and 18-year-old Oliver Daemen from its spaceport near Van Horn, Texas. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Tony Gutierrez/AP

Covid-19 infections in New York City are climbing for the first time in months as the delta variant gains traction and vaccination rates in some boroughs remain stubbornly low. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Delta Variant And The Latest Coronavirus Surge

COVID-19 cases are on the rise in the last month due to the Delta variant. NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey talks with Emily Kwong about where the virus is resurging, how some public health officials are reacting and what they are recommending. Also, with a spate of outbreaks at summer camp, officials are weighing in on what parents can do before they send children to camp.

The Delta Variant And The Latest Coronavirus Surge

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Technology consultant Frank Thai creates a 3-D scan of a preserved cadaver in the medical school's Anatomy Resource Center. Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine hide caption

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Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine

New Data Leads To Rethinking (Once More) Where The Pandemic Actually Began

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When working out in the summer, watch for the signs of dehydration and heat stroke. Choosing a later evening or early morning time for a run in one smart way to stay safe. RyanJLane/Getty Images hide caption

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