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The James Webb space telescope is an infrared telescope that will observe the early universe, between one million and a few billion years in age. NASA hide caption

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NASA

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

In December, NASA is scheduled to launch the huge $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope, which is sometimes billed as the successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope. NPR correspondents Rhitu Chatterjee and Nell Greenfieldboyce talk about this powerful new instrument and why building it took two decades.

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

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An artist's conception of the James Webb Space Telescope after it has unfolded in space. NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez hide caption

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NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez

NASA's Got A New, Big Telescope. It Could Find Hints Of Life On Far-Flung Planets

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In the first Biden administration rule aimed at combating climate change, the Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to phase down production and use of hydrofluorocarbons, highly potent greenhouse gases commonly used in refrigerators and air conditioners. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Ben Elliott gets barreled at the BSR Surf Resort, where artificial waves are attracting world-class talent. Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort hide caption

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Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort

The Surf's Always Up — In Waco, Texas

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A bald eagle perches on a tree at Sunset Park in Rock Island, Ill., in March. A new study says that many species of birds increasingly moved into urban areas as human activity waned during the pandemic. Joel Lerner/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Lerner/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

As inspiration for all trees preparing their autumnal hues, here's a beautiful red oak photographed in Berlin's Kreuzberg district on October 28, 2020. DAVID GANNON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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DAVID GANNON/AFP via Getty Images

Evidence seized from a drug trafficking operation in central California in early 2020 included methamphetamine and fentanyl with a street value of $1.5 million, authorities said. Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP

Methamphetamine Deaths Soar, Hitting Black And Native Americans Especially Hard

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Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, appears before a Senate committee in July. Many public health leaders say letting the agency go so long without a permanent director has demoralized staff and sends the wrong message about the agency's importance. Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP

A male Bougainville Whistler (Pachycephala richardsi), a species endemic to Bougainville Island. This whistler is named after Guy Richards, one of the collectors on the Whitney South Sea Expedition. Iain Woxvold hide caption

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Iain Woxvold

China says it will stop financing new coal-fired power plants in other countries, but coal use is expected to keeping rising within its borders. GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images

COVID booster shots are currently recommended for those 65 and up, as well as people who are immunocompromised. Emily Elconin/Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Elconin/Getty Images

Boosters Won't Make It To Everyone For Now, But Vaccines For Young Children Are Coming

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Illustration of antibodies (y-shaped) responding to an infection with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

How Long Does COVID Immunity Last Anyway?

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Everyday tasks — such as buttoning a shirt, opening a jar or brushing teeth — can suddenly seem impossible after a stroke that affects the brain's fine motor control of the hands. New research suggests starting intensive rehab a bit later than typically happens now — and continuing it longer — might improve recovery. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

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This photo made available by the Library of Congress shows a demonstration at the Red Cross Emergency Ambulance Station in Washington during the influenza pandemic of 1918. Library of Congress/AP hide caption

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Library of Congress/AP

Firefighters wrapped foil around the base of the General Sherman tree to protect the gigantic sequoia from an intense wildfire. Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks hide caption

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Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks

A nurse holds a vial of Moderna Covid-19 vaccine. Patrick Meinhardt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Meinhardt/AFP via Getty Images

Afraid of Needles? You're Not Alone

Many people are afraid of needles in some capacity — about 1 in 10 experience a "high level" of needle fear, says clinical psychologist Meghan McMurtry. But that fear is often underrecognized or misunderstood. That's why today's show is all about needle fear: what it is, tools to cope, and why it's important to address beyond the pandemic.

Afraid of Needles? You're Not Alone

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