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Hidden Brain: A Study Of Airline Delays

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UMass food scientists Lynne McLandsborough, left, and Lili He are researching ways to use your smartphone to detect bacteria in food. Karen Brown/New England Public Radio hide caption

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Karen Brown/New England Public Radio

Virginia Harrod, an attorney and county prosecutor who lives in rural Kentucky, survived breast cancer, only to develop lymphedema, which sent her to the hospital three times with serious infections. A lymph node transplant helped restore her immune system. Luke Sharrett for NPR hide caption

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Luke Sharrett for NPR

She Survived Breast Cancer, But Says A Treatment Side Effect 'Almost Killed' Her

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV vaccination at Amistad Community Health Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 2016. Though gender differences in vaccine rates have narrowed, more girls than boys tend to get immunized against HPV. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get It

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This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Smallpox virus, colorized and magnified in this micrograph 42,000 times, is the real concern for biologists working on a cousin virus — horsepox. They're hoping to develop a better vaccine against smallpox, should that human scourge ever be used as a bioweapon. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

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The link between science and superheroes is evident in Marvel Studios' Black Panther. Science is why T'Challa's nation, Wakanda, is globally preeminent. Marvel Studios 2018 hide caption

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Marvel Studios 2018

Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

This image, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows the supernova remnant SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B. It is located 160,000 light-years from Earth in a neighboring galaxy called the Large Magellanic Cloud. Space Telescope Science Institute/NASA, ESA and Y.-H. Chu (Academia Sinica, Taipei) hide caption

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Space Telescope Science Institute/NASA, ESA and Y.-H. Chu (Academia Sinica, Taipei)

Staff at Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute sluice juvenile white seabass into a cage at Santa Catalina Island, in Southern California, where they grow before being released into the ocean. Thirty-five years ago, the state launched the program to bolster waning white seabass numbers. Now the first scientific assessment of the program finds it had a stunningly low success rate. Mike Shane/Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute hide caption

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Mike Shane/Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute

An African penguin holds a Valentine's Day card at the California Academy of Sciences. The birds use the love tokens to line their nests and encourage breeding. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A Matabele ant treats the wounds of a mate whose limbs were bitten off during a fight with termite soldiers. Erik T. Frank/Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg hide caption

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Erik T. Frank/Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg

The top science adviser to the EPA, Michael Honeycutt, has been the lead toxicologist for the state of Texas since 2003. Texas cities, including Houston, have struggled for decades with some of the worst air quality in the country. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Top EPA Science Adviser Has History Of Questioning Pollution Research

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Ray Vester served on the Arkansas State Plant Board for 18 years. "It's self-governing, by the people, for the people," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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These Citizen-Regulators In Arkansas Defied Monsanto. Now They're Under Attack

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