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Rural communities across the country, places largely spared during the early days of the pandemic, are now seeing spikes in infections and hospitalizations. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

COVID-19 Surges In Rural Communities, Overwhelming Some Local Hospitals

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The remnants of Hurricane Sandy churn up Lake Michigan in Chicago in 2012. Flood risk in the city is increasing as climate change drives more extreme rain, and renters face greater financial peril than homeowners. More than half of Chicagoans are renters, according to 2019 census data. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Most Tenants Get No Information About Flooding. It Can Cost Them Dearly

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Passengers wear face masks at Tocumen International Airport in Panama City on Oct. 12. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

From Air Travel to Hospital Treatment, We're Still Learning About The Virus

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A California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection airplane drops fire retardant along a burning hill during the Glass Fire in Calistoga, Calif., in September. California is one of two states to require wildfire risk be disclosed to new homebuyers. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Homes Are At Risk Of Wildfires, But It's Rarely Disclosed

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Recruiting patients for medical studies has been challenging during the pandemic, especially older people who are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously Despite The Pandemic

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Lachlan (left) and Lillian Barilleau play in the backyard of their home in Central, La. They were displaced from the house for months after a flood in 2016. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Living In Harm's Way: Why Most Flood Risk Is Not Disclosed

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In his book How To, Randall Munroe explores whether you could open enough water bottles to fill a swimming pool — using nuclear weapons. Riverhead Books hide caption

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Riverhead Books

Randall Munroe's Absurd Scientific Advice For Real-World Problems

Randall Munroe, the cartoonist behind the popular Internet comic xkcd, finds complicated solutions to simple, real-world problems. In the process, he reveals a lot about science and why the real world is sometimes even weirder than we expect. His latest book is called How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems. (Encore episode.)

Randall Munroe's Absurd Scientific Advice For Real-World Problems

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Mental health advocates say 988, a simple three-digit number, will be easier for people to remember in the midst of a mental health emergency. T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF

New Law Creates 988 Hotline For Mental Health Emergencies

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This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 images collected on Dec. 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

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Conceptual artwork of quantum entanglement, one of the consequences of quantum theory. Two particles will appear to be linked across space and time, with changes to one of the particles (such as an observation or measurement) affecting the other one. Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

The Washington State Department of Agriculture team tracked the Asian giant hornet for about an hour earlier this month, before losing her signal in a forest. Courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture hide caption

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Courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture

Foiled Again: Murder Hornet Eludes Washington State Scientists

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Rebecca Knill speaks at TED@WellsFargo, February 5, 2020, at the Knight Theater in Charlotte, NC. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED

Rebecca Knill: Technology Has Come So Far—When Will Our Mindset Catch-Up?

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Dallas Taylor speaks as part of TED2020: Uncharted. May 21, 2020. Photo courtesy of TED. Courtesy of TED/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED/Courtesy of TED

Dallas Taylor: What Can We Learn From Listening To Silence?

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jimhudspeth_2019s-embed Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED

Jim Hudspeth: How Do We Hear — And How Do We Lose Our Ability To Hear?

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Emily Garti, a junior studying nutrition, gets her twice-weekly COVID-19 test at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

The Tricky Business Of Coronavirus Testing On College Campuses

We hit the road with NPR Education Reporter Elissa Nadworny. She's been on a weekslong road trip to get an up-close view of how colleges across the U.S. are handling the pandemic. On today's show, she tells us how one university has been using mass testing to fight the spread of the coronavirus on its campus. It's a strategy that's run into some challenges, namely, student behavior.

The Tricky Business Of Coronavirus Testing On College Campuses

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Tobacco plants are being used in the development of COVID-19 vaccines. One is already being tested in humans. Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Tobacco Plants Contribute Key Ingredient For COVID-19 Vaccine

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says Thanksgiving gatherings could cause coronavirus cases to rise even faster than they already are. Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic 'Halftime': U.S. Looks At Lessons Learned As Fall & Holidays Near

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Matt Kasson

A Disturbing Twinkie That Has, So Far, Defied Science

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"The excitement for me has been to slowly uncover the secret lives of many of these cryptic animals," says Craig Foster. "My incredible octopus teacher, she helped me in many ways to uncover many of those lives, because she's in the middle of this food web." Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Filmmaker Finds An Unlikely Underwater Friend In 'My Octopus Teacher'

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