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At seventeen years old, Fred Clay was sentenced to prison for a crime he did not commit. Various flawed ideas in psychology were used to determine his guilt. Ken Richardson/Ken Richardson hide caption

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Ken Richardson/Ken Richardson

A healthcare worker looks out from a window in the door to the COVID-19 Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas, July 2. Despite its renowned medical center with the largest agglomeration of hospitals and research laboratories in the world, Houston is on the verge of being overwhelmed by cases of coronavirus exploding in Texas. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Lawsuit Forces Release of Government Data On Racial Inequity Of Coronavirus

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A flooded street in Orange, Texas in 2017. Climate-driven extreme rain and sea level rise, coupled with development in flood-prone areas, have led to more competition for limited federal flood mitigation dollars. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Georgia Tech, pictured in 2016, will be holding some in-person classes in the fall. Faculty are upset that face coverings will not be mandatory. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Peet Sapsin directs clients inside custom built "Gainz Pods", during his HIIT class, (high intensity interval training), at Sapsins Inspire South Bay Fitness, Redondo Beach, California, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Recent protests in Philadelphia and across the country have drawn young people. But for most of the pandemic, youth have been quarantined and away from their social circles, which could make depression and other mental illness worse. Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Why Some Young People Fear Social Isolation More Than COVID-19

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A face mask covers the mouth and nose of one of the iconic lion statues in front of the New York Public Library Main Branch on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, in New York, amid the coronavirus pandemic. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Widespread Use Of Face Masks Could Save Tens Of Thousands Of Lives, Models Project

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A view of fireworks over Times Square on July 1 in New York City. This is the third of six July Fourth firework displays in locations around the city that are kept secret in an attempt to minimize crowds gathering in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Fauci Admits Government Fault On Masks; Celebrating July 4 Safely

Employers added 4.8 million jobs last month but the U.S. is still down 15 million jobs since February. And those new figures are from a survey before the recent surge in COVID-19 cases.

Fauci Admits Government Fault On Masks; Celebrating July 4 Safely

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Left to right: a neck gaiter (aka a buff) that slips over the head; a KN95 respirator, a version of the N95 respirator used in U.S. hospitals; a pleated surgical mask (below the KN95); a cloth mask. Photo illustration by Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Max Posner/NPR

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, prepares to testify at a hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on June 30. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

The Mask Debate Is Over; Fauci On Mandates, Vaccine Skepticism

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A medical worker places a swab in a vial while testing for the coronavirus through the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust in Miami. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Why Latinx People Are Hospitalized From COVID-19 At 4 Times The Rate Of Whites

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Dr. Danielle Hairston, a psychiatry residency director at Howard University in Washington, D.C., trains and mentors young black doctors. Quraishia Ford hide caption

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Quraishia Ford

To Be Young, A Doctor And Black: Overcoming Racial Barriers In Medical Training

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The Smithfield Foods pork processing plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota was one of the country's largest known coronavirus clusters. KEREM YUCEL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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KEREM YUCEL/AFP via Getty Images

On Monday, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany fielded queries about the government response to the coronavirus pandemic and about a report that the Trump Administration failed to organize a response to a Russian plot to pay bounties to the Taliban to kill American troops in Afghanistan. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gaps In The Russian Bounties Story; Fauci Warns Of 100k Cases A Day

Dr. Anthony Fauci told members of Congress Tuesday that although he can't predict the ultimate number of coronavirus cases in the United States, he "would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around."

Gaps In The Russian Bounties Story; Fauci Warns Of 100k Cases A Day

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Gilead Sciences, maker of the antiviral drug remdesivir, has come up with a price for the COVID-19 treatment that was less than some analysts expected. ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment

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The Supreme Court ruled on Monday, in a 5-4 decision, a Louisiana law that required doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges to nearby hospitals unconstitutional. Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images

After SCOTUS Decision, The Future Of Abortion Rights; Mask Mandates

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Thomas Jefferson owned hundreds of slaves, yet he also wrote that "all men are created equal." How did he square the contradictions between his values and his everyday life? ericfoltz/Getty Images hide caption

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ericfoltz/Getty Images

The snake Chrysopelea paradisi is seen in Malaysia's Taman Negara National Park. To get from tree to tree, they can propel themselves in the air. David Renoult/iNaturalist hide caption

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David Renoult/iNaturalist

How Snakes Fly (Hint: It's Not On A Plane)

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Then-Director of the National Institutes of Health Elias Zerhouni speaks with President George W. Bush during a round table discussion on cancer prevention at the NIH in Bethesda, Md., in 2007. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images