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Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

A monarch butterfly flies to Joe Pye weed, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019, in Freeport, Maine. Rapid development and climate change are escalating the rates of species loss, according to the United Nations. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Migrating Monarchs

It is one of the Earth's great migrations: each year, millions of monarch butterflies fly some 3,000 miles, from their summer breeding grounds as far north as Canada to their overwintering sites in the central Mexico. It's one of the best-studied migrations and in recent years, ecologists like Sonia Altizer have been able to better answer how and why these intrepid butterflies make the journey. Short Wave brings this episode from the TED Radio Hour's episode with Sonia Altizer, with the University of Georgia.

Migrating Monarchs

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Crazy worms — an invasive species from Asia — pose a threat to forests, scientists say. The worms can thrash around so violently that they can jump out of a person's hand. They also lose their tail — on purpose. Josef Görres/Plant and Soil Science Department University of Vermont hide caption

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Josef Görres/Plant and Soil Science Department University of Vermont

A wall-mounted thermostat in a California home. New research finds households that can least afford it are spending more than they have to on electricity. Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images

How many oceans are there? It's National Geographic official now: There are five. Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images

Coming Soon To An Atlas Near You: A Fifth Ocean

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Courtesy of TED

Mandë Holford: Could Snail Venom Someday Save Your Life?

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Ryan Lash / TED

Ayana Elizabeth Johnson: Why The Strange and Wonderful Parrot Fish Is In Trouble

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Courtesy of TED

Marah Hardt: What Can We Learn From The Sex Lives Of Fish?

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Courtesy of Catherine Mohr

Catherine Mohr: A Love Story... That Begins With A Sea Urchin

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Black-legged ticks carrying the bacterium that causes Lyme have been found in the coastal chaparrals surrounding California beaches. James Gathany/CDC via AP hide caption

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James Gathany/CDC via AP

Brassica oleracea is a plant species that includes broccoli--as well as kale, cauliflower, collard greens and brussels sprouts. Inti St Clair/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Inti St Clair/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Yep, We Made Up Vegetables

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The northern lights (aurora borealis) illuminate the sky over Reinfjorden in Reine, on Lofoten Islands in the Arctic Circle in 2017. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images

Therapist Kiki Radermacher was one of the first members of a mobile crisis response unit in Missoula, Mont., which started responding to emergency mental health calls last year. That pilot project becomes permanent in July and is one of six such teams in the state — up from one in 2019. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

A meadow reflects in a raindrop hanging from a blade of grass in Dresden, Germany. Robert Michael/dpa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Michael/dpa/AFP via Getty Images

Vivek Murthy, then a nominee for U.S. surgeon general, testifies at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee on Feb. 25 in Washington, D.C. Murthy also served as surgeon general in the Obama and Trump administrations. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

By the time Victoria Cooper enrolled in an alcohol treatment program in 2018, she was "drinking for survival," not pleasure, she says — multiple vodka shots in the morning, at lunchtime and beyond. In the treatment program, she saw other women in their 20s struggling with alcohol and other drugs. "It was the first time in a very long time that I had not felt alone," she says. Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News

Women Now Drink As Much As Men — Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope

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