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Genetically modified "gene drive" mosquitoes feed on warm cow's blood. Scientists hope these mosquitoes could help eradicate malaria. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab

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Wallace Broecker, a professor at Columbia University in New York, speaking during the Balzan Prize ceremony in Rome in 2008. Broecker, a climate scientist who popularized the term "global warming," died Monday. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

Carrie and Emma Buck in 1924, right before the Buck v. Bell trial, which provided the first court approval of a law allowing forced sterilization in Virginia. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY hide caption

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M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY

Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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NASA astronaut Anne McClain, attends her final exam at the Gagarin Cosmonauts' Training Centre outside Moscow on Nov. 14, 2018. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

'Every Day Is A Good Day When You're Floating': Anne McClain Talks Life In Space

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An American coot flies over Brooklyn's Prospect Park Lake on Feb. 5. Courtesy of August Davidson-Onsgard hide caption

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Courtesy of August Davidson-Onsgard

Talkin' Birds: The Great Backyard Bird Count

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An artist's concept shows a NASA Mars exploration rover on the surface of Mars. The twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity were launched in 2003 and arrived at sites on Mars in January 2004. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Opinion: Good Night Oppy, A Farewell To NASA's Mars Rover

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Thanks in part to his original songwriting, singing and guitar-playing, Physics doctoral student Pramodh Senarath Yapa beat out the remaining entrants to win this year's "Dance Your Ph.D." contest. Courtesy of Matthias Le Dall hide caption

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Courtesy of Matthias Le Dall

Ph.D. Student Breaks Down Electron Physics Into A Swinging Musical

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J. Marshall Shepherd on the TED stage. TED hide caption

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TED

J. Marshall Shepherd: How Does Bias Shape Our Perceptions About Science?

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Andreas Ekstrom on the TED stage. TED hide caption

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TED

Andreas Ekström: Can We Solve For Bias In Tech?

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Dramatic decreases in deaths from lung cancer among African-Americans were particularly notable, according to the American Cancer Society. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

Scientists around the world criticized Chinese researcher He Jiankui's experimental editing of DNA in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

In 2011, a 17-year-old named Mishka told readers of his Facebook post that his Salem, Ore., high school was "asking for a f***ing shooting." That post and other furious outbursts triggered a quick, but deep evaluation by the school district's threat assessment unit. Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

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NASA's Opportunity rover used its navigation camera to capture this northward view of tracks in May 2010 during its long trek to Mars' Endeavour crater. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity Is Officially Declared Dead

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A white-tailed deer keeps its ears open while grazing in South Hero, Vt. Rob Swanson/AP hide caption

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Rob Swanson/AP

Hungry Deer May Be Changing How Things Sound In The Forest

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Scientists have isolated a molecule with disease-fighting potential in a microbe living on a type of fungus-farming ant (genus Cyphomyrmex). The microbe kills off other hostile microbes attacking the ants' fungus, a food source. Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander Wild/University of Wisconsin

Images of the object nicknamed Ultima Thule photographed from the New Horizons spacecraft on Jan. 1. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Getty Images

A researcher examines the underwater hull of the USS Hornet CV-8, which played a role in several key events of World War II. Photo courtesy of Paul G. Allen's Vulcan Inc hide caption

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Photo courtesy of Paul G. Allen's Vulcan Inc
Alex Maxim/Getty Images/All Canada Photos