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A bounty of black holes surround the Sagittarius A supermassive black hole which lies at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. NASA/CXC/Columbia Univ./C. Hailey et al. hide caption

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NASA/CXC/Columbia Univ./C. Hailey et al.

What does a black hole sound like? NASA has an answer

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Scientists have discovered that a drug used to treat HIV helps restore a particular kind of memory loss in mice. The results hold promise for humans, too. ROBERT F. BUKATY/AP hide caption

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ROBERT F. BUKATY/AP

A drug for HIV appears to reverse a type of memory loss in mice

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Black or brown hydrogen is extracted from coal. Gray hydrogen is made by heating natural gas. Both create carbon dioxide. Blue hydrogen captures about 90% of that carbon dioxide and stores it, usually underground. Green hydrogen uses renewable energy to split hydrogen out of water using electricity. Pink hydrogen does the same but relies on nuclear power. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

Encore: The United States' only native parrot is being studied, to save it

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Demonstrators attend a candlelight vigil Wednesday in Fairfax, Va., for the victims of the Uvalde and Buffalo mass shootings. Allison Bailey/Reuters Connect hide caption

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Allison Bailey/Reuters Connect

Research shows policies that may help prevent mass shootings — and some that don't

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An HIV drug appears to boost memory in mice, study shows

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The shapes in this salt crystal are consistent with what would be expected for microorganisms. Kathy Benison hide caption

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Kathy Benison

This 830-million-year-old crystal might contain life. And we're about to open it

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Parachutes for spacecraft are challenging to design and worrisome to engineers

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Animal sexuality may not be as binary as we're led to believe, according to new book

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Study finds microscopic life in 830-million-year-old crystal – and it might be alive!

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The International Space Station depends on a mix of U.S. and Russian parts. "I hope we can hold it together as long as we can," says former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space

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An aerial photo taken in April 2020 shows the scenery of a giant karst sinkhole in China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. A similar sinkhole was found earlier this month with an ancient forest at the bottom with trees towering over 100 feet tall. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Rahima Banu, pictured with her mother in Bangladesh in 1975, is recorded as having the last known naturally-occurring case of the deadly form of smallpox. Daniel Tarantola/WHO hide caption

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Daniel Tarantola/WHO

How Rahima came to hold a special place in smallpox history — and help ensure its end

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