Science The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.

Scientists Say It's Time For America To End Fixation On Herd Immunity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/997422830/997422831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After the CDC shifted this week to less restrictive mask guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some leaders in the public health world felt blindsided. While some people rejoiced, others say they feel the change has come too soon. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

The New York Yankees, including manager Aaron Boone, are back to wearing masks after the team reported eight "breakthrough" COVID-19 cases this week. Julio Aguilar/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Julio Aguilar/Getty Images

The CDC's new guidelines on face coverings and social distancing are raising questions about grocery store requirements moving forward. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Ada daSilva/Getty Images

Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/996471535/996591792" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists believe some heavy elements are forged when a massive star goes through its death throes and explodes as a supernova. Here, Kepler's supernova remnant was captured in a NASA image. NASA/ESA/Johns Hopkins University/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/ESA/Johns Hopkins University/NASA

Freshly Made Plutonium From Outer Space Found On Ocean Floor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/996499035/997009581" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man who is paralyzed was able to type with 95% accuracy by imagining that he was handwriting letters on a sheet of paper, a team reported in the journal Nature. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Man Who Is Paralyzed Communicates By Imagining Handwriting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/996141182/996286632" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anti-vaccine advocates are using the COVID-19 pandemic to promote books, supplementals and services. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

For Some Anti-Vaccine Advocates, Misinformation Is Part Of A Business

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993615185/996079301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This 16-year-old got a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 shot late last month at the UCI Health Family Health Center in Anaheim, Calif. Students as young as 12 are now eligible to get the vaccine, too, the FDA says. Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

Ash the cat selects the Kanizsa square stimulus — in other words, the illusion of a square — in a new study in which pet owners provided the data. Tara McCready hide caption

toggle caption
Tara McCready

Cats Take 'If I Fits I Sits' Seriously, Even If The Space Is Just An Illusion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/994262792/995590253" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: COVID-19 Vaccine, Clashes In Jerusalem, Gene-Editing Experiment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/995340942/995340943" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Carlene Knight, 54, is one of the first patients in a landmark study designed to try to restore vision in those who have a rare genetic disease that causes blindness. Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993656603/995341044" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Italian Culture Ministry said the Guattari Cave in San Felice Circeo was "one of the most significant places in the world for the history of Neanderthals." Emanuele Antonio Minerva/Italian Culture Ministry via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Emanuele Antonio Minerva/Italian Culture Ministry via AP

Uncovering The Neuston, A Mysterious Living Island Of Sea Creatures

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/995173043/995173044" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript