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A female orca named Wikie swims with a calf in 2011 at Marineland in Antibes, France. Wikie was the central animal in a study, published Wednesday, about orcas' ability to imitate human speech. Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images

Middle Palaeolithic artifacts recently excavated from Attirampakkam, an archaeological site in present-day southern India. The artifacts suggest the technique used to make them spread across the world long before researchers previously thought. Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India/Nature hide caption

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Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India/Nature

Ocellated turkeys stand out for their bright blue heads and iridescent feathers. They're still around the Yucatan today. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Scientists zeroed in on specific neurons in the brains of mice to gain insights into how anxiety is triggered and suppressed. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Researchers Discover 'Anxiety Cells' In The Brain

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What scientists believe to be our oldest ancestor, the single-celled organism named LUCA, likely lived in extreme conditions where magma met water — in a setting similar to this one from Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images hide caption

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Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt told the Senate environment committee that he does not remember comments he made in 2016 about then-candidate Donald Trump. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

EXCERPT: Scott Pruitt on KFAQ's Pat Campbell Show Feb. 4, 2016

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Some of the "milks" on offer by Elmhurst Milked, which operated as a traditional dairy in New York for nearly 100 years. These days, Elmhurst has replaced cows with nuts, oats and rice. Courtesy of Elmhurst Milked hide caption

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Courtesy of Elmhurst Milked

Scientists are hoping that seagrasses could act as a buffer against acidifying oceans. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Can Seagrass Save Shellfish From Climate Change?

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A block of Tomme de Savoie cheese ages with a sweater of Mucor lanceolatus fungal mold. Mucor itself doesn't have a strong taste, but more flavorful bacteria can travel far and wide along its hyphae — the microscopic, branched tendrils that fungi use to bring in nutrients. Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe