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How does your child's spoonful of medicine measure up? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Why It's So Easy To Give Kids The Wrong Dose Of Medicine

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Mexico's President Felipe Calderon (left) starts a wind turbine that will help power the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Cancun. Officials will spend the next two weeks debating how to mobilize money to cope with climate change as temperatures climb, ice melts and seas rise. Israel Leal/AP hide caption

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Israel Leal/AP

Officials Aim For Small Wins In Cancun Climate Talks

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The deep-water-research submarine Alvin is launched from Atlantis. Scientists are studying how ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico may have been affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Scientists, Nations Disagree Over Tuna Catch Limits

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Megan Lindsey (right) and her friend Alexandria Bodfish at soccer camp at University of Notre Dame.  Megan, 14, suffered concussions twice this fall while playing soccer. Courtesy of Barbara Wirtz hide caption

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Courtesy of Barbara Wirtz

Parents, Coaches Worry About Concussion Risks

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Cycling has at least tripled over the past two decades in several big cities across the U.S., including Minneapolis, Chicago and San Francisco. Jonathan Steinberg hide caption

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Jonathan Steinberg

Switching Gears: More Commuters Bike To Work

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A hybrid solarized gas turbine power station owned by AORA Solar, a new Israeli company pushing solar hybrid technology, sits in the southern Israeli kibbutz of Samar. David Buimovitch/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David Buimovitch/AFP/Getty Images

Israel's Clean-Tech Boom Draws A New Green Line

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Dr. Barry Gordon, a neurologist and an experimental psychologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, has been trying to help his son Alex find language. Alex, pictured here at 7 years was always non-verbal and diagnosed as autistic at age 4. Courtesy of the Gordon Family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Gordon Family

Eat Up: Eating a large meal at the holidays won't have a big impact on your weight, says one physiologist. That's because your brain keeps a close watch on food intake and can tolerate the occasional big meal. It's slow, steady weight gain that's more problematic. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Post-Feast Weight Gain Isn't As Bad As You Think

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