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A pair of California sea lions nuzzles on a dock in San Francisco. Between 1998 and 2017, nearly 700 California sea lions were found with gunshot and stab wounds in California, Oregon and Washington. Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images

Harvard Medical School Dean Weighs In On Ethics Of Gene Editing

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In experiments involving people with epilepsy, targeted zaps of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex region of the brain helped ease depressive symptoms. Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Improve Mood By Stimulating A Brain Area Above The Eyes

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American biologist David Baltimore criticized a fellow scientist who claims he has edited the genes human embryos during the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong. China News Service/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

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Researcher He Jiankui spoke Wednesday during the 2nd International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies

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Tianjin, in northern China, is home to Tianjin University, an international research center that recently hired an American to lead its school of pharmaceutical science and technology. He recruits students from all over the world, he says, and the program's classes are taught in English. Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students

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Chinese Scientist Says He's Created First Genetically Modified Babies

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New Probe Lands On Mars For Unprecedented Mission

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Different apples need different controlled storage environments. For example, Honeycrisps are sensitive to low temperatures so you can't put them in cold environments right after they've been harvested. And Fujis can't take high carbon dioxide levels. Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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