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Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Dogs rescued from floodwater wait to be transferred to a shelter after torrential rains pounded Southeast Texas following Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey on Sept. 3, 2017 in Orange, Texas. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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This 1793 grave is an early version of the kilogram. It is possible this object, now owned by the National Institute of Standards and Technology museum, was once pirate treasure. NIST Museum hide caption

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NIST Museum

How Pirates Of The Caribbean Hijacked America's Metric System

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The smaller the bubble in that glass of champagne, the higher the pitch — and the price. Viktoria Rodriguez/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Viktoria Rodriguez/Getty Images/EyeEm

The sound of bubbles in a glass of Moët & Chandon champagne.

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Home For The Holidays? Get Off The Couch!

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The Haunting Effects Of Going Days Without Sleep

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Two people swim at a beach in Vieques, Puerto Rico. One of the bays on the island is famous for its bioluminescent plankton, which are slowly recovering after Hurricane Maria. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

After Maria, One Of The World's Best Bioluminescent Bays Slowly Begins To Glow Again

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Corals around the world have been dying because of warming waters and pollution. Some researchers hope they can reverse the trend by growing new corals in the lab. Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons

As Corals Wither Around The World, Scientists Try IVF

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