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The mother orca, known as J-35, pushes her dead calf to the surface last week off the coast of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. The infant orca died shortly after its birth, but its mother has been observed carrying it with her in the days afterward. Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP hide caption

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Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP

Wildfires More Common in Western U.S.

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A female orca that appears to be grieving has been carrying her dead calf in the water, keeping it afloat since the baby died more than a week ago. Taylor Shedd/Soundwatch, taken under NMFS MMPA permit #21114 hide caption

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Taylor Shedd/Soundwatch, taken under NMFS MMPA permit #21114

Fisherman Darius Kasprzak searches for cod in the Gulf of Alaska. The cod population there is at its lowest level on record. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Feidt for NPR

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

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With financial aid declining, many college students can't afford to eat, studies show, even though about 40 percent are also working. Nearly 1 in 4 college students are parents, which can add to their financial stress. franckreporter/Getty Images hide caption

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franckreporter/Getty Images

Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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Bubble tea, or boba, features large tapioca balls at the bottom meant to be sucked up through a plastic straw. Vendors say paper straws don't always work as well, and they're more expensive. Samantha Shanahan/KQED hide caption

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Samantha Shanahan/KQED

San Francisco Is Poised To Ban Plastic Straws. That's Got Bubble Tea Shops Worried

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Hell's Backbone Grill is located in Boulder, Utah, about 250 miles south of Salt Lake City. The restaurant's owners are fighting Trump's plans to slash the size of nearby Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument by more than half. Ace Kvale hide caption

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Ace Kvale

Changing Climate Pushes Arid West Eastward, Impacting Farming

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Unless you replenish fluids, just an hour's hike in the heat or a 30-minute run might be enough to get mildly dehydrated, scientists say. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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RunPhoto/Getty Images

Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated

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A polar bear attacked and injured a polar bear guard who was leading tourists off a cruise ship on the Svalbard archipelago between mainland Norway and the North Pole. The polar bear was shot dead by another employee, the cruise company said. Gustav Busch Arntsen/AP hide caption

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Gustav Busch Arntsen/AP

A woman uses a portable fan to cool herself in Tokyo on Tuesday as Japan suffers from a heat wave. Scientists say extreme weather events will likely happen more often as the planet gets warmer. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

When The Weather Is Extreme, Is Climate Change To Blame?

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