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A man who is paralyzed was able to type with 95% accuracy by imagining that he was handwriting letters on a sheet of paper, a team reported in the journal Nature. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Man Who Is Paralyzed Communicates By Imagining Handwriting

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Anti-vaccine advocates are using the COVID-19 pandemic to promote books, supplementals and services. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

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Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

For Some Anti-Vaccine Advocates, Misinformation Is Part Of A Business

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This 16-year-old got a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 shot late last month at the UCI Health Family Health Center in Anaheim, Calif. Students as young as 12 are now eligible to get the vaccine, too, the FDA says. Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

Ash the cat selects the Kanizsa square stimulus — in other words, the illusion of a square — in a new study in which pet owners provided the data. Tara McCready hide caption

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Tara McCready

Cats Take 'If I Fits I Sits' Seriously, Even If The Space Is Just An Illusion

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News Brief: COVID-19 Vaccine, Clashes In Jerusalem, Gene-Editing Experiment

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Carlene Knight, 54, is one of the first patients in a landmark study designed to try to restore vision in those who have a rare genetic disease that causes blindness. Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision

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The Italian Culture Ministry said the Guattari Cave in San Felice Circeo was "one of the most significant places in the world for the history of Neanderthals." Emanuele Antonio Minerva/Italian Culture Ministry via AP hide caption

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Emanuele Antonio Minerva/Italian Culture Ministry via AP

Uncovering The Neuston, A Mysterious Living Island Of Sea Creatures

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Family members and relatives wearing protective gear arrive to cremate the bodies of victims who died of the COVID-19 at an open air crematorium on the outskirts of Bangalore on Saturday. Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images

A firefighter administers the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination center near Paris on Monday. The European Union has signed a deal to buy as many as 1.8 billion doses. Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images

Scientists once compared the abilities of humans versus canines in tracking a trail of chocolate essential oil laid down in an open field. Though the humans weren't nearly as proficient as the dogs, they did get better with practice. Vladimir Godnik/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Vladimir Godnik/Getty Images/fStop

The numerals in the illustration show the main mutation sites of the B.1.1.7 variant first detected in the U.K., which is more transmissible than other variants. Here, the virus's spike protein (red) is bound to a human cell (blue). Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Science Source

Is The Variant From India The Most Contagious Coronavirus Mutant On The Planet?

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Even after full vaccination against COVID-19, people who have had organ transplants are urged by their doctors to keep wearing masks and taking extra precautions. Research shows the strong drugs they must take to prevent organ rejection can significantly blunt their body's response to the vaccine. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

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DigiPub/Getty Images

Vaccination Against COVID 'Does Not Mean Immunity' For People With Organ Transplants

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"We're tracking it. We're following it as closely as we can. It's just a little too soon right now to know where it's going to go or what if anything can be done about that," a U.S. Space Command spokesman told reporters. Guo Wenbin/AP hide caption

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Guo Wenbin/AP