Space NPR coverage of space exploration, space shuttle missions, news from NASA, private space exploration, satellite technology, and new discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics.

An artist's concept portrays a NASA rover exploring the surface of Mars. Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech

Waiting For Opportunity To Get In Touch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662913017/663123162" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This October 2008 photo shows Mercury during the Messenger spacecraft's second flyby of the planet. The European Space Agency's BepiColombo will take seven years to reach the innermost planet in our solar system. NASA, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington via AP hide caption

toggle caption
NASA, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington via AP

A Slow Trip To A Hot Planet: Spacecraft Launches For Mission To Mercury

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/654341131/658962106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Smoke rises as first-stage boosters separate from a Soyuz rocket with a Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying a NASA astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut. The mission was aborted shortly after launch, and the pair returned to Earth safely in an emergency landing. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

(Top row, from left) Titan, Earth's moon, Europa and Enceladus. (Bottom row, from left) Callisto, Charon, Ariel and lo. Courtesty of NASA hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesty of NASA

Scientists Find What Could Be A History-Making Moon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653666274/654124064" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The orbits of the new extreme dwarf planet 2015 TG387 and its fellow inner Oort Cloud objects 2012 VP113 and Sedna as compared with the rest of the Solar System. 2015 TG387 was nicknamed ͞"The Goblin" by its discoverers, as its provisional designation contains TG and the object was first seen near Halloween. Illustration by Roberto Molar Candanosa and Scott Sheppard, courtesy of Carnegie Institution for Science. hide caption

toggle caption
Illustration by Roberto Molar Candanosa and Scott Sheppard, courtesy of Carnegie Institution for Science.

A Small Planet With Big Implications

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653453443/653780013" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Colorado School of Mines has started the world's first Space Resources degree program. Professor Angel Abbud-Madrid conducts an online class from his offices in Golden, Colo. Dan Boyce for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Boyce for NPR

Space Mining — Learning How To Fuel An Interplanetary Gas Station

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/648917308/651373830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk, left, shakes hands with Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, right, on Monday, after announcing that he will be the first private passenger on a trip around the moon. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Carlson/AP

Neil deGrasse Tyson attends Film Independent at LACMA presents StarTalk — A Conversation with Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, on June 5 in Los Angeles. Araya Diaz/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Araya Diaz/Getty Images

Astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell Burnell, pictured in 2011, has been awarded the $3 million Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. Colin McPherson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Colin McPherson/Corbis via Getty Images

A 2-millimeter hole was found last week in a Russian Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft (left) that is docked to the International Space Station. NASA/AP hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/AP

Who Caused The Mysterious Leak At The International Space Station?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/644820679/644973505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alberta Aurora Chasers captured STEVE in April in British Columbia, Canada. STEVE is the narrow ribbon of white-purple hues overhead, and the vibrant green light on the right is an aurora located further north. Ryan Sault hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Sault

Artist's concept of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. Launching in 2018, Parker Solar Probe will provide new data on solar activity and make critical contributions to our ability to forecast major space-weather events that impact life on Earth. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/637133541/637230149" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vice President Pence announces the Trump Administration's plan to create the U.S. Space Force by 2020 during a speech at the Pentagon on Thursday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

NASA has named nine astronauts to crew the first test flights and missions of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule. From left to right: Sunita Williams, Josh Cassada, Eric Boe, Nicole Mann, Christopher Ferguson, Douglas Hurley, Robert Behnken, Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA