Space NPR coverage of space exploration, space shuttle missions, news from NASA, private space exploration, satellite technology, and new discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics.

In 'Light Of The Stars,' Adam Frank Studies Alien Worlds To Find Earth's Fate

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Asteroid Ryugu, photographed on June 26 by the Hayabusa2 spacecraft, was the Japanese mission's destination. The craft will travel alongside the asteroid for 18 months. JAXA, University of Tokyo and collaborators hide caption

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JAXA, University of Tokyo and collaborators

A dust storm has reduced sunlight and visibility on Mars. But NASA's Curiosity rover, seen in a self-portrait taken last week in the Gale Crater, runs on nuclear energy and is powering through. NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP

Global map of Mars showing a growing dust storm as of June 6, 2018. The map was produced by the Mars Color Imager (MARCI) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Giant Dust Storm On Mars Threatening To End NASA's Opportunity Rover

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These two views from NASA's Curiosity rover, acquired specifically to measure the amount of dust inside Gale Crater, show that dust has increased over three days from a major Martian dust storm. The left-hand image shows a view of the east-northeast rim of Gale Crater on June 7, 2018 (Sol 2074); the right-hand image shows a view of the same feature on June 10, 2018 (Sol 2077). NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Enormous Dust Storm On Mars Threatens The Opportunity Rover

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Two rock samples taken by NASA's Curiosity rover were found to contain organic molecules. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Chemical Building Blocks For Life On Mars

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Astronaut Alan Bean was photographed by Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr., who is reflected in Bean's helmet visor, during the Apollo 12 moonwalk in 1969. Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr./NASA hide caption

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Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr./NASA

Alan Bean, Apollo 12 Astronaut Who Walked On The Moon, Dies At 86

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The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

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NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

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The orbit of the Earth (blue line) and its near-intersection with Asteroid 2010 WC9 (in white) is seen in this diagram by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory hide caption

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NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory

This is an artist's concept of a plume of water vapor thought to be ejected off of the frigid, icy surface of the Jovian moon Europa, located 500 million miles from the sun. NASA, ESA, and K. Retherford hide caption

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NASA, ESA, and K. Retherford

Icy Moon Of Jupiter Spews Water Plumes Into Space

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The planet, known as Kepler-452b, was believed to be about 60 percent larger than our planet and within the habitable zone of its star. NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle hide caption

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NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Earth's 'Bigger, Older Cousin' Maybe Doesn't Even Exist

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The Atlas V rocket carrying the Mars InSight lander launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base, as seen from the San Gabriel Mountains more than 100 miles away, on Saturday morning. The InSight probe is the first NASA lander designed entirely to study the deep interior structure of Mars. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

An artist's rendition of NASA's InSight lander, which is expected to launch on Saturday morning. InSight will monitor the Red Planet's seismic activity and internal temperature. NASA/JPL-CalTech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-CalTech

NASA Is Heading Back To Mars To Peer Inside The Red Planet

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Ellen Stofan saw her first rocket launch when she was 4 years old. Now, more than 50 years later, she's director of the National Air and Space Museum — the first woman to hold the position. Amanda Edwards/Getty Images for Discovery hide caption

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Amanda Edwards/Getty Images for Discovery

New Director Of Air And Space Museum Is The First Woman To Hold The Job

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The European spacecraft known as Gaia has unveiled this new view of the Milky Way. ESA/Gaia/DPAC hide caption

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ESA/Gaia/DPAC

You Are Here: Scientists Unveil Precise Map Of More Than A Billion Stars

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