Space NPR coverage of space exploration, space shuttle missions, news from NASA, private space exploration, satellite technology, and new discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics.

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Astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. walks near the lunar module during the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

'One Giant Leap' Explores The Herculean Effort Behind The 1969 Moon Landing

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A Falcon 9 rocket carried 60 satellites for SpaceX's Starlink broadband network into space last month. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Astronomers Worry That Elon Musk's New Satellites Will Ruin The View

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An imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe produced all the things in existence, including corned beef sandwiches. Erik Rank/Getty Images hide caption

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Erik Rank/Getty Images

Why Corned Beef Sandwiches — And The Rest Of The Universe — Exist

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Phil Plait Phil Plait hide caption

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Phil Plait

Phil Plait: How Can Mistakes Lead To Scientific Advancement?

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A stripe of red dots shows the risk corridor for a hypothetical asteroid strike, part of an exercise this week held by planetary defense experts in which they analyze data about a fictitious asteroid. Landsat/Copernicus/Google Earth/Dept. of State Geographer hide caption

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Landsat/Copernicus/Google Earth/Dept. of State Geographer

This Week, NASA Is Pretending An Asteroid Is On Its Way To Smack The Earth

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South Korean President Park Geun-hye walks past a NASA logo during a tour at the agency's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Do You Love Lying In Bed? Get Paid By NASA To Do It For Space Research

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The first-ever image of a black hole was released Wednesday by a consortium of researchers, showing the "black hole at the center of galaxy M87, outlined by emission from hot gas swirling around it under the influence of strong gravity near its event horizon." Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al hide caption

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Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al

Japan's Hayabusa2, seen in this illustration, has been probing the asteroid Ryugu since 2018. The spacecraft is collecting samples that will be returned to Earth. JAXA/Akihiro Ikeshita hide caption

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JAXA/Akihiro Ikeshita

Japan (Very Carefully) Drops Plastic Explosives Onto An Asteroid

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India launched a ballistic missile defense interceptor last week — and NASA says it created dangerous debris in orbit. "We have identified 400 pieces of orbital debris from that one event," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said. Handout /Reuters hide caption

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Handout /Reuters

This illustration made available by NASA shows the Kepler space telescope, the planet-hunting spacecraft that launched in 2009. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

Young Astronomer Uses Artificial Intelligence To Discover 2 Exoplanets

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Scientist Corey Gray and his mother, Sharon Yellowfly, are pictured at one of the two massive detectors that make up the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory. One facility, where Gray works, is in Washington state, and the other is in Louisiana. Courtesy of Russell Barber hide caption

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Courtesy of Russell Barber

How A Cosmic Collision Sparked A Native American Translator's Labor Of Love

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Experts believe the target of Wednesday's anti-satellite test was India's Microsat-R, which is shown here launching in January. Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images

India Claims Successful Test Of Anti-Satellite Weapon

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The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory is made up of two detectors, this one in Livingston, La., and one near Hanford, Wash. The detectors use giant arms in the shape of an "L" to measure tiny ripples in the fabric of the universe. Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab hide caption

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Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab

Massive U.S. Machines That Hunt For Ripples In Space-Time Just Got An Upgrade

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The Crew Dragon landed safely in the Atlantic Ocean on Friday morning, with a splashdown at 8:45 a.m. ET, as scheduled. The uncrewed craft had been on a test flight in which it docked with the International Space Station. NASA TV Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NASA TV Screenshot by NPR

In this photo provided by NASA, the SpaceX Crew Dragon is pictured just beside the International Space Station. SpaceX's new crew capsule arrived at the station on Sunday in a remarkable moment for commercial space exploration. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

In this illustration, SpaceX's Crew Dragon approaches the International Space Station for docking. The capsule has room to carry seven astronauts. SpaceX/NASA hide caption

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SpaceX/NASA

SpaceX Readies For Key Test Of Capsule Built To Carry Astronauts Into Space

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Astronaut Buzz Aldrin walks on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission in 1969. The landing site at Tranquility Base has remained mostly untouched — though that could change as more nations and even commercial companies start to explore the moon. NASA hide caption

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NASA

How Do You Preserve History On The Moon?

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