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Northrup Grumman's Antares rocket lifts off from the NASA Wallops test flight facility in Virginia on Oct. 2. The rocket was scheduled to deliver supplies to the International Space Station. Thom Baur/Northrup Grumman /AP hide caption

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Thom Baur/Northrup Grumman /AP

Influencers In Space: Astronauts Prepare To Receive Cosmetics And A New Toilet

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Images from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory highlight the appearance of the sun at solar minimum (left, December 2019) versus solar maximum (right, April 2014). NASA hide caption

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NASA

The images used to create this view of Venus were acquired by the Mariner 10 craft on Feb. 7 and 8, 1974. Decades after the Mariner 2 flew by the planet in 1962, much about the planet remains unknown. NASA hide caption

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NASA

A Possible Sign Of Life Right Next Door To Earth, On Venus

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China may have landed a new space plane on Sept. 6 at this secretive air base, located in China in the desert near an old nuclear testing ground. Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc.

New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

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Romanesco broccoli, as seen by a 3.2 billion pixel camera. Scientists chose to take a picture of the broccoli because of its fractal shape. LSST Camera team/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory/Rubin Observatory hide caption

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LSST Camera team/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory/Rubin Observatory

California Scientists Build A Camera To Take Pictures Of Huge Swath Of Sky

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. A drug to achieve the same effect was recently tested in space. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Drug That Bulked Up Mice In Space Might Someday Help Astronauts Make Long Voyages

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An STS-125 crew member onboard the space shuttle Atlantis snaps a still photo of the Hubble Space Telescope following grapple of the giant observatory by the shuttle. Johnson Space Center/NASA hide caption

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Johnson Space Center/NASA

The Hubble Space Telescope Still Works Great — Except When It Doesn't

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Katie Mack's book The End of Everything (Astrophysically Speaking) explores some of the ways astrophysicists are thinking about the end of the universe. Nerissa Escanlar hide caption

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Nerissa Escanlar

SPACE WEEK: An Astrophysicist On The End Of Everything

*Astrophysically speaking. That's the subject of Katie Mack's new book: the possible ends to our entire universe. Specifically, she breaks down some following potential outcomes: heat death, the big crunch and vacuum decay. (Spoiler alert: the names of the other scenarios we don't get to in this episode are just as cool.)

SPACE WEEK: An Astrophysicist On The End Of Everything

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Dots of orbital debris are visible in this image of the Lunar Module Challenger from the Apollo 17 spacecraft, after docking maneuvers. The debris is from the Saturn S-IVB stage separation. NASA hide caption

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NASA

NASA visualization of what matter looks like as it falls into a black hole, a process known as accretion. Jeremy Schnittman/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center hide caption

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Jeremy Schnittman/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

SPACE WEEK: What Would It Be Like To Fall Into A Black Hole?

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The moons of Mars, Phobos and Deimos. NASA hide caption

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NASA

SPACE WEEK: Every Moon, Ranked

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Observations of the GOODS-North field are used to try to understand dark energy. P. Oesch/University of Geneva; M. Montes/University of New South Wales/ESA/NASA hide caption

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P. Oesch/University of Geneva; M. Montes/University of New South Wales/ESA/NASA

Since its completion in 1963, the Arecibo Observatory has played a key role in discoveries ranging from new insights into pulsars to detecting planets outside our solar system. Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The Pacific Ocean from space. In both liquid and frozen form, water covers most of the Earth's surface, and there's been a debate among scientists about where all the water originated. Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

Water, Water, Every Where — And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From

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The Perseid Meteor Shower, shown here near Death Valley, Calif. in 2019, is one of the most popular of the year. It will peak late Tuesday night and in the early hours of Wednesday morning. Bob Riha Jr/Getty Images hide caption

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Bob Riha Jr/Getty Images

A satellite image from Planet Labs, a private satellite company, shows the exhaust from a North Korean missile test on May 4, 2019. Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc.

From Desert Battlefields To Coral Reefs, Private Satellites Revolutionize The View

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The SpaceX capsule sits aboard a recovery ship in the Gulf of Mexico. NASA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NASA/Screenshot by NPR

Splashdown! SpaceX And NASA Astronauts Make History

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NASA astronauts (from left) Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley and Chris Cassidy are the U.S. members of the Expedition 63 crew aboard the International Space Station. Behnken and Hurley are scheduled to return to Earth on Aug. 2. NASA hide caption

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NASA

A United Arab Emirates spacecraft rockets away on a seven-month journey to Mars. MHI via AP hide caption

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MHI via AP

Gen. John "Jay" Raymond, with President Trump and Defense Secretary Mark Esper during a ceremony to establish the U.S. Space Command last summer. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP