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For years, the satellites that make up America's Global Position System have been carrying sensors that measure the weather in space. This image illustrates the orbital planes in which GPS satellites travel around Earth. Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory hide caption

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Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory

Apollo 1 astronauts Ed White (from left), Gus Grissom and Roger Chaffee, 1967. The astronauts died as a result of a fire in the cockpit during a training session on Jan. 27, 1967. Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

50 Years Later, NASA Creates Tribute To 3 Astronauts Who Died In Space Race

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Funeral Service Will Remember Gene Cernan, Last Man To Walk On The Moon

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A composite image of Earth taken at 1:07 p.m. ET on Jan. 15 by the GOES-16 satellite. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Astronomer Wanda Diaz Merced talks about "sonification" on the TED stage. Marla Aufmuth/TED hide caption

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Marla Aufmuth/TED

How Can We Hear The Stars?

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Cernan in the Apollo 17 lunar module after one of three moonwalks. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Gene Cernan, Last Man To Walk On The Moon, Dies At 82

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NASA Faces The Unknown In Preparing For Trump Administration

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Scientists used the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array near Socorro, N.M., to detect fast radio bursts. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

An artist's rendering of a black hole that's 2 billion times more massive than our sun. Streams of particles ejected from black holes like this one are thought to be the brightest objects in the universe. ESO/M. Kornmesser hide caption

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ESO/M. Kornmesser

Some Bizarre Black Holes Put On Light Shows

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How Will The Universe End?

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