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NASA's rover Curiosity crawls up the side of Vera Rubin Ridge on Mars' surface in January 2018. Mount Sharp — a 3-mile-high mountain — can be seen in the distance. MSSS/ NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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MSSS/ NASA/JPL-Caltech

Exploring The Mysterious Origins Of Mars' 3-Mile-High Sand Pile

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The rover Yutu-2 is seen in a photo taken by the lander of the Chang'e-4 probe on Jan. 11. Inside the probe is a biosphere harboring, whose seeds China now says have died. AP via China National Space Administration via Xinhua News Agency hide caption

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AP via China National Space Administration via Xinhua News Agency

President Trump called for a beefing up of existing defenses, such as the Aegis ashore system pictured. In addition, he called for research into new advanced concepts. Mark Wright/Missile Defense Agency hide caption

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Mark Wright/Missile Defense Agency

Trump Unveils Ambitious Missile Defense Plans

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Iran's Simorgh rocket pictured before an attempted satellite launch in 2017. Experts say the rocket's second stage is too small to be used as a missile. Iranian Defense Ministry via AP hide caption

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Iranian Defense Ministry via AP

CHIME Pathfinder prototype radio telescope Keith Vanderlinde/Dunlap Institute hide caption

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Keith Vanderlinde/Dunlap Institute

Astronomers' New Tool May Help Solve Intergalactic Mystery

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Chinese Spacecraft Lands On Far Side Of The Moon

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A Look At The Methodical Plan China Has Laid Out For Space Exploration

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How China's Space Ambitions Fit Into Its Larger Geopolitical Strategy

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This photo, provided by China National Space Administration via Xinhua News Agency, is the first image of the moon's far side ever taken from the surface. A Chinese spacecraft on Thursday made the first landing on the far side of the moon, state media said. Imaginechina via AP hide caption

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Imaginechina via AP

This enhanced color image of Ultima Thule was taken at a distance of 85,000 miles and highlights its reddish surface. The image on the right has a far higher spatial resolution. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute